Posts Tagged: Mayor’s Youth Council

BBA Summer Jobs Program Kicks Off

BBA summer jobs students, keynote speaker Rahsaan Hall, summer jobs steering committe co-chairs Matt Mctygue and Colin Van Dyke.

BBA summer jobs students with keynote speaker Rahsaan Hall, and Summer Jobs Steering Committee co-chairs Matt Mctygue and Colin Van Dyke.

 

The 22nd BBA Summer Jobs Programs is officially underway. Yesterday, the students headed to 16 Beacon Street for a crash course in business etiquette at the program orientation. This morning, they returned to 16 Beacon to meet their employers at the annual Kickoff Event. This year’s keynote speaker Rahsaan Hall, the Deputy Director at the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Economic Justice, shared some words of wisdom and encouragement with the students.

Here’s what the BBA‘s own Summer Jobs interns had to say about the event:

028It was amazing to attend the Kickoff Event. I really liked Rahsaan Hall’s speech. It was inspirational and motivating.  It opened my mind to more possibilities.

Jennifer Le, a recent graduate of Boston Community Leadership Academy in Hyde Park

 

 

Elijah HeadshotRahsaan Hall’s speech at today’s Kickoff was very inspiring. I was feeling insecure and uncomfortable when I got here, but his speech about the man who chose the broken down bucket really spoke to me. The idea that we all offer something even if we don’t know what it is motivated me, and I am definitely ready for the rest of the summer.  

Elijah Oyenuga, a recent graduate of Another Course to College in Brighton

As you may remember, the BBA Summer Jobs Program is part of the City of Boston’s citywide summer jobs initiative for Boston teens. If you missed this article last month, Mayor Marty Walsh announced that the city will be creating 200 more summer job positions for Boston youth in addition to the 10,000 positions already secured, including our 65 positions in the legal field.

 

Check out the pictures below for some highlights from this year’s Orientation and Kickoff event:

Boston PICs Senior Career Specialist Teresa (Terry) Alleyne gives the summer jobs students some business etiquette tips at orientation.

Boston PICs Senior Career Specialist Teresa (Terry) Alleyne gives the Summer Jobs students a few business etiquette tips at orientation.

Students learn the ins and outs of office life.

Terry Alleyne helped the students get excited about their new Summer Job positions.

Summer Jobs Steering Committee co-chair Colin Van Dyke at this years summer jobs kickoff event .

Summer Jobs Steering Committee co-chair Colin Van Dyke at this years Summer Jobs Kickoff event.

This years summer jobs kickoff keynote speaker Rahsaan Hall.

Summer Jobs Kickoff keynote speaker Rahsaan Hall.

Summer jobs student.

Summer Jobs students listen attentively to Rahsaan Halls useful advice.

DLA Piper's Elaine Carmichael and summer jobs student Harmona Taib.

DLA Piper’s Elaine Carmichael and Summer Jobs student Hermuna Taib.

Vincent Fichera, Ashley Commito, and Jennifer Carpenter from LPL Financial and their summer jobs student Maylerin Valdez.

Vincent Fichera, Ashley Commito, and Jennifer Carpenter from LPL Financial and their Summer Jobs student Maylerin Valdez.

Stay tuned for more updates about the Summer Jobs students throughout the summer.

 

BBA Schools Mayor’s Youth Council on the Ins and Outs of Policy

Mike

Last week, BBA Director of Government Relations & Public Affairs Mike Avitzur headed across the street to Boston City Hall to discuss key policy issues. However, this time he was meeting with a different group of representatives—Boston teens from the Mayor’s Youth Council (MYC). As you may know, the BBA is a longstanding partner of the MYC, teaming up with the City of Boston and Northeastern University. Mike was invited to lend his policy expertise to help the 85 teens who represent their Boston neighborhoods refine their policy recommendations to the Mayor. Here’s what he had to say about the experience:

“It was great to have a chance to talk with young people who are so interested in public policy and so engaged with trying to make a positive difference in the world around them.”

So what types of policy ideas are on the table? Here are a few of the representatives’ ideas:

  • Tax incentives for small businesses that employ young people;
  • Community policing training for MBTA police;
  • Tax incentives for organizations that provide advertising for non-profits; and
  • Banning alcohol advertising on city and state owned property.

Mike presented key questions to think about before their meetings with officials, such as how much will this policy cost and who are the key stakeholders who will support or oppose it? The representatives then worked to outline answers to each question and identify areas for additional research. So what’s up next? The MYC will continue to research and hone their ideas before making formal recommendations to the Mayor.

Sit Down With Summer Jobs and Mayor’s Youth Council Superstar

Mayor’s Youth Council Representative and former Summer Jobs Student Benjamin Haideri introduced Mayor Thomas Menino at the 20th Anniversary of the Mayor's Youth Council Celebration.

Mayor’s Youth Council Representative and former Summer Jobs Student Benjamin Haideri introduced Mayor Thomas Menino at the 20th Anniversary of the Mayor’s Youth Council Celebration.

When BBA President Paul Dacier and Executive Director Rich Page attended the 20th Anniversary Celebration of the Mayor’s Youth Council (MYC), they saw a familiar face introducing Mayor Thomas Menino. That face was Ben Haideri’s, who represents his community of Roslindale on the MYC and interned at the Suffolk District Attorney’s Office through the BBA Summer Jobs Program last summer.

Beyond the Billable sat down with Ben to talk to him about his experiences with the MYC and BBA Summer Jobs Program.

We started by discussing Ben’s experience at the Dorchester District Court Branch of the Suffolk DA’s Office — where he spent most of his summer (you may remember him from this article). As an aspiring lawyer, he felt that the courtroom experience would be particularly valuable:

“I spent a lot of time in the courtroom watching trials. One of the trials lasted two days, and I decided that I would write a closing statement just for fun. I gave it to the prosecutor to review and she ended up using a chunk of it in her closing statements.”

While finishing up his senior year at Boston Latin Academy, Ben is also enjoying his second year serving on the MYC. As a representative, Ben participates in two meetings each month, identifies issues affecting his community, such as integration, and works with other representatives to brainstorm solutions. When we asked him to tell us a highlight from his time on the MYC, he mentioned his speech about the important of getting youth involved in government. It’s probably worth mentioning that the speech was given in front of 3,000 people, including mayors from across the country, at the National League of Cities Conference.

Ben is waiting to hear back from colleges and hopes to study political science before going on to attend law school. “I came into the BBA Summer Jobs Program knowing that I wanted to be a lawyer and the experience solidified it. Through the Mayor’s Youth Council, I gained experience with outreach, writing, and giving speeches. These skills are important because you need to be a good communicator to be an effective lawyer.”

It’s also worth noting that Ben’s position was funded thanks to contributions to the Boston Bar Foundation, which provided funding for 13 positions for Boston Public High School students to work at nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and courts last summer.

Sitting Down with Former Mayor’s Youth Council Representative Ronaldo Rauseo-Ricupero

As you may know, the BBA has provided the Mayor’s Youth Council (MYC) with lawyer-mentors since its inception in 1994. To get a better sense of their experience, we sat down with Ronaldo Rauseo-Ricupero, who represented his community of East Boston on the MYC from 1997-2000. Rauseo-Ricupero is a Government Investigations associate at Nixon Peabody and a member of the BBA’s Litigation Section Steering Committee.

Why is it important to give youth a voice in the city?

“Youth are the greatest stakeholder in the city because they are some of the largest consumers of city programs. They attend the public schools, utilize community centers, and access city services. However, they do not have the ability to vote and voice their opinion. The MYC draws on youth and engages them in dialogue with top officials about the issues that affect them.”

How did MYC influence your future education and/or professional decisions?

“Mayor Menino was a great leader and inspiration. He showed me what a government can do if it’s genuinely dedicated and brings all voices to the table to make actual change. MYC is the reason I have stayed involved in civic affairs. I learned how to do creative work when working together.”

Why are attorneys uniquely qualified to serve as mentors for the Mayor’s Youth Council?

“A lot of the work the MYC does is public speaking and advocacy… Youth have wishes, dreams, and hopes but they need help channeling them into something constructive that acknowledges the other competing issues at hand… The main role of the mentor is to help high schoolers, who know their view but have trouble with other person’s views, understand the other perspective. Attorneys are trained in negotiation skills and understanding other perspectives.”

Rauseo-Ricupero remains committed to civic engagement and his city, which he attributes in large part to what he learned from Mayor Menino and the MYC. He currently is a member of the Board of the John William Ward Public Service Fellowship, serves on the City of Boston Scholarship Committee, and assists with programming for the MYC.

For more information on how to get involved with the Mayor’s Youth Council, please contact Katie D’Angelo, Public Service Programs Coordinator, at [email protected].

BBA President Celebrates 20th Anniversary of the Mayor’s Youth Council

 BBA President Paul Dacier and Mayor Thomas Menino pose with the current representatives and alumni of the Mayor’s Youth Council.

BBA President Paul Dacier and Mayor Thomas Menino pose with the current representatives and alumni of the Mayor’s Youth Council.

Last Friday night BBA President Paul Dacier and BBA Executive Director Rich Page joined Mayor Thomas Menino along with the current representatives and alumni of the Mayor’s Youth Council (MYC) at the 20th Anniversary Celebration. As you may know, the BBA is a longstanding partner of the MYC, combining efforts with the City of Boston and Northeastern University.

Here’s what BBA President Paul Dacier had to say about the event:

“It was such an honor to be part of the 20th Anniversary Celebration of the Mayor’s Youth Council. The students selected for the program are an incredibly impressive group. I couldn’t believe what they have accomplished throughout our city in just the past year – connecting with hundreds of teens on important issues, getting the word out in every community about education and growth opportunities and working with local leaders on expanding youth initiatives. It is programs like this that truly empower the young people in our city, and the BBA is proud to be a partner.”

In addition to recognizing the accomplishments of the MYC, the event paid special tribute to Mayor Menino, who created the Council in 1994 and remains committed to Boston youth throughout his term in office.

See below for more photos from the event:

2012-2013 Mayor’s Youth Council Representative and former Summer Jobs Student Benjamin Haideri introduced Mayor Thomas Menino.

2012-2013 Mayor’s Youth Council Representative and former Summer Jobs Student Benjamin Haideri introduced Mayor Thomas Menino.

John Tobin (Northeastern University), BBA President Paul Dacier, and Mayor Thomas Menino pose with current Mayor’s Youth Council representatives.

John Tobin (Northeastern University), BBA President Paul Dacier, and Mayor Thomas Menino pose with current Mayor’s Youth Council representatives.

Stay tuned for more information on the Mayor’s Youth Council.

Mentors Make a Difference at Mayor’s Youth Council

This past year, Christina Miller (Suffolk District Attorney’s Office) and Ed Gorman (Law Office of Ed Gorman) served as mentors for the group of Boston Public High School juniors and seniors who have been selected to represent their neighborhoods in the Mayor’s Youth Council. In their role as mentors, Miller and Gorman helped guide students thought their program goals and develop skills in various capacities including executing and leading meetings. The BBA has co-sponsored the Mayor’s Youth Council with the Mayor’s Office and Northeastern University since 1994.

The Mayor’s Youth Council, a partnership between the BBA, Mayor’s Office and Northeastern University, gives young people the opportunity to reach out to other Boston teens. The BBA provides the Mayor’s Youth Council lawyer-mentors.

Beyond the Billable asked Miller about her favorite moment of the year. Here’s what she had to say:

“I have so many favorite moments that it is difficult to pick just one. If I have to pick, it would be the time I conducted a mock interview for a student who is on the Mayor’s Youth Council. She came across as shy at first and minimized her achievements. Instead of minimizing, we worked on her maximizing her experiences. She worked on positively presenting her work and how that work contributed to the public and made her a better leader. We worked on her handshake and posture, as well as other markers of confidence. She reported that she felt great about the interview and felt more confidently about herself – focusing on maximizing! It felt great to help her find the confidence within herself.”

For more information on the Mayor’s Youth Council, please contact Katie D’Angelo, public service programs coordinator, at [email protected].

Public Service Year in Photos

In January 2012, the John & Abigail Adams Benefit raised over $600,000. That amount helped to fund grants to 24 Massachusetts community organizations providing legal services in areas such as immigration, domestic violence and homelessness.

Volunteer lawyers and law students help unrepresented tenants and landlords with a range of services, from information, and advice for full representation in eviction proceedings.  Since May 1999, an estimated 12,000 volunteers have assisted more than 14,700 individuals. Joanna Allison Staff Attorney at the Volunteer Lawyers Project and Chris Saccardi, Law Office of Christopher T. Saccardi at the Boston Housing Court.

At the BBA Lawyer for a Day in the Boston Housing Court, volunteer lawyers and law students helped unrepresented tenants and landlords with a range of services — from information and advice to full representation in eviction proceedings. Since May 1999, an estimated 12,000 volunteers have assisted more than 14,700 individuals. Joanna Allison Staff Attorney at the Volunteer Lawyers Project and Chris Saccardi, Law Office of Christopher T. Saccardi at the Boston Housing Court.

Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley spoke to East Boston High School students as part of the M. Ellen Carpenter Financial Literacy Program, a joint program of the Boston Bar Association and the U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley spoke to East Boston High School students as part of the M. Ellen Carpenter Financial Literacy Program, a joint program of the Boston Bar Association and the U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

Emily Hodge, Choate, Hall & Stewart, teaches students about the importance of due process and access to justice at the Josiah Quincy Elementary School. In May 2012, 28 volunteers taught 580 students at 5 different schools about the field of law.

Emily Hodge, Choate, Hall & Stewart LLP, as part of Law Day in the Schools taught students about the importance of due process and access to justice at the Josiah Quincy Elementary School. In May 2012, 28 volunteers taught 580 students at 5 different schools about the field of law.

The Lawyer Referral Service (LRS), is the BBA’s largest public service program, with a specific commitment to reaching historically underserved populations. The LRS Program connects callers in need of legal assistance with qualified help from private attorneys, legal services agencies, government offices and community programs.

The Lawyer Referral Service (LRS), is the BBA’s largest public service program, with a specific commitment to reaching historically underserved populations. The LRS Program connects callers in need of legal assistance with qualified help from private attorneys, legal services agencies, government offices and community programs.

In its ninth year of producing young public interest leaders, the Public Interest Leadership Program selected an outstanding class of 14 up-and-coming leaders from the largest-ever applicant pool. The 2012-2013 class of the BBA's Public Interest Leadership Program. L-R: Omar F. Gonzalez-Pagan, Staci Rubin, Benton B. Bodamer, Christopher T. Saccardi, Eric A. Haskell, Julia E. Devanthéry, Jacqueline Silva Anchondo, Emily F. Hodge, Meghan D. H. Walsh Raquel Webster and Daniel M. Routh

In its ninth year of producing young public interest leaders, the Public Interest Leadership Program selected an outstanding class of 14 up-and-coming leaders from the largest-ever applicant pool. The 2012-2013 class of the BBA’s Public Interest Leadership Program. L-R: Omar F. Gonzalez-Pagan, Staci Rubin, Benton B. Bodamer, Christopher T. Saccardi, Eric A. Haskell, Julia E. Devanthéry, Jacqueline Silva Anchondo, Emily F. Hodge, Meghan D. H. Walsh Raquel Webster and Daniel M. Routh.

The Mayor’s Youth Council, a partnership between the BBA, Mayor’s Office and Northeastern University, gives young people the opportunity to reach out to other Boston teens. The BBA provides the Mayor’s Youth Council lawyer-mentors. Lisa Goodheart, Past President of the BBA with Mayor Thomas M. Menino at the 2012 Mayor’s Youth Council Reception at Northeastern University.

The Mayor’s Youth Council, a partnership between the BBA, the Mayor’s Office and Northeastern University, gives young people the opportunity to reach out to other Boston teens. The BBA provides the Mayor’s Youth Council lawyer-mentors. Lisa Goodheart, Past President of the BBA with Mayor Thomas M. Menino at the 2012 Mayor’s Youth Council Reception at Northeastern University.

Larry DiCara, a partner at Nixon Peabody and former member and president of the Boston City Council conducts a mock City Council hearing with the 2012 Summer Jobs students. L-R: Tatenda Mundeke, Aubrey Griffin, Raymond Cen, Ashley Dixon, and Samantha Argon.

Larry DiCara, a partner at Nixon Peabody and former President of the Boston City Council conducted a mock City Council hearing with the 2012 Summer Jobs students. L-R: Tatenda Mundeke, Aubrey Griffin, Raymond Cen, Ashley Dixon, and Samantha Argon.

At the 4th Annual Pro Bono Fair for Attorneys and Law Students sponsored by BBA and the Rappaport Center for Law and Public Service, Sarah Sherman-Stokes of the Political Asylum/Immigration Representation Project, a Boston Bar Foundation Grantee, explains the pro bono opportunities available in Greater Boston.

At the 4th Annual Pro Bono Fair for Attorneys and Law Students sponsored by BBA and the Rappaport Center for Law and Public Service, Sarah Sherman-Stokes of the Political Asylum/Immigration Representation Project, a Boston Bar Foundation Grantee, explained the pro bono opportunities available in Greater Boston.

BBA President James D. Smeallie talks to 8th and 9th graders at Quincy Upper School during the Principal for A Day program on Tuesday, November 13th. The program allowed public and private sector leaders to better understand the improvements and remaining challenges in the Boston public school system.

BBA President James D. Smeallie talked with 8th and 9th graders at Quincy Upper School during the Principal for A Day program on Tuesday, November 13th. The program allowed public and private sector leaders to better understand improvements and remaining challenges in the Boston public school system.

Steve Stein, Executive Director of Boston Debate League conducts a training for BBA volunteers to be judges at debate tournaments. The BBA entered a partnership with Boston Debate League earlier this year.

Steve Stein, Executive Director of Boston Debate League trained BBA volunteers to be judges at debate tournaments. The BBA entered into a partnership with Boston Debate League earlier this year.

BBA Past President Renee Landers (Suffolk Law School) presented GLAD Civil Rights Project Director Mary Bonauto and Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley with the Beacon Award honoring Diversity & Inclusion for their work as lawyers in advancing same sex marriage. The Boston Bar Association’s third annual Beacon Award for Diversity & Inclusion took place on November 13 at the Liberty Hotel in Boston.

BBA Past President Renee Landers (Suffolk Law School) presented GLAD Civil Rights Project Director Mary Bonauto and Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley with the Beacon Award honoring Diversity & Inclusion for their work as lawyers in advancing same sex marriage. The Boston Bar Association’s third annual Beacon Award for Diversity & Inclusion took place on November 13 at the Liberty Hotel in Boston.

BBA Connects with Boston’s Young Leaders

Lisa Goodheart, President of the BBA with Mayor Thomas M. Menino at the 2012 Mayor’s Youth Council Reception at Northeastern University.

Beyond the Billable recently attended a reception at Mayor Menino’s 2012 reception for the Mayor’s Youth Council (MYC). Over the years the BBA has provided mentors for this initiative, and we chatted with two of them to find out how they feel about donating their time to the MYC.  Here’s what we learned.

The BBA first became involved in what would become the Mayor’s Youth Council in 1990 through its predecessor, the Mayor’s Youth Leadership Corps.  The Corps represented a public-private partnership among the City of Boston, the BBA and Northeastern University.  The aim of the program was multifold – to show Boston youth how the city and its’ many institutions worked, to develop leadership, encourage community service and promote personal growth in today’s young people.  The foundations of the MYC reside firmly in roots of the Mayor’s Youth Leadership Corps.

Since 1994, the BBA has been proud to provide the MYC with lawyer-mentors. In addition to attending bi-monthly meetings at Boston City Hall, the mentors guide students through their program goals and help develop their skills in a variety of different capacities – including executing and leading meetings.  Here at Beyond the Billable, we wanted to find out from our mentors what it means to give their time to the MYC.

Edmund J. Gorman, Law Office of Edmund J. Gorman

Tonight, I begin my 8th year as a BBA mentor for the MYC.  I     participate because I support the BBA’s focus on helping Boston’s kids.  Also, I like to think that my service honors the men and women who mentored me at a time when a professional career was anything but a certainty.

Our role as BBA mentors has numerous facets.  Each year, the MYC representatives identify an issue or two that are important to their lives as teenagers. e.g., school nutrition, public safety and violence prevention, civility on the “T,” substance abuse, summer jobs, and after-school programs. With the help of the Mayor’s staff, the kids then design a program to learn more about the issues and to share what they’ve learned by “outreach” to their peers at schools, neighborhood libraries, and recreation centers. The mentors assist the MYC’s planning by steering the discussions to focus on the specific issue and goal.  Sometimes, we ask questions to generate more thinking and discussion while at other times we try to answer questions, especially when the roles of law and government are pertinent.

Occasionally, we share an anecdote to illustrate a point.  For example, a few kids scoffed at the notion of teens taking a minimum wage or no-pay summer job.  I explained that I began working at 16 years old for $1.60 per hour.  That employer is now a major client and I believe I was selected as its counsel in part because I had swept the floors. I also related how I volunteered many after-school hours working on a recycling program for my hometown, which in turn was the seed for a lifelong interest and career in environmental law.  They now understand that our journeys begin with small steps.

Neil Austin, Foley Hoag LLP

I participate in Mayor’s Youth Council as a means to engage publicly with Boston-area high school students (a portion of the city’s population with which I would otherwise have little interaction) and to be a resource to those students as they embark upon their college years and begin to think about what they want to do with their lives.

The Mayor’s Youth Council has a lot in common with the BBA’s Public Interest Leadership Program.  It is a year-long program made up of members selected after a competitive application process.  The key goals of Mayor’s Youth Council are to foster leadership among its members and to serve as a vehicle for outreach to the larger community of high school students in Boston.  In addition to attending regular meetings, MYC members are involved in planning and carrying out a limited number of projects through the year (for example, this year, the Council conducted a resume workshop).

Being a mentor is a rewarding and low-stress activity that involves attending the bi-monthly Council meetings at City Hall and facilitating debate and discussion among Council members regarding issues affecting youth in the City of Boston.  Outside of regularly-scheduled meetings, mentors are often involved in facilitating the Council’s special projects.  This year, I attended the resume-writing workshop with another BBA volunteer and provided tips and feedback to high school students preparing resumes for summer jobs and college admissions. 

The MYC consists of 36 students selected to represent their neighborhoods as volunteers on this citywide board.  Many of these young leaders are selected to participate in the BBA Summer Jobs Program. Each class of the Council establishes an annual program agenda and works to meet these goals throughout the year.  The 2011-2012 MYC class focused on issues of education, health, youth development, neighborhood safety, environment and communications.  They held meetings with community leaders including the Executive Director of the Boston Youth Fund to discuss Boston’s teen job strategy and a representative from the Boston Police Department to address concerns regarding healthy and positive youth and police partnerships.