Posts Tagged: Children and Youth

BBA Volunteers Make Big Impact at Local Debate Tournaments

Last year, as we began our partnership with the Boston Debate League (BDL), enlisting lawyers to be judges for debate tournaments, there was a buzz of excitement throughout the BBA. In a few short months the partnership is already a resounding success.

Every month from October through March, BDL holds debate tournaments for Boston Public High School debate teams. So far this year, almost 40 BBA volunteers have been judges at tournaments. After a successful January tournament, BDL reached out to the BBA to thank us for our collaboration:

This month we had a struggle for volunteers but it all worked out. The BBA members allowed our tournament to have a good core of knowledgeable judges for our more experienced divisions (varsity/championship) and made themselves available for our divisions who didn’t have as many volunteers sign up to judge for the weekend. Thank you so much for your support.

In addition to the judges, there are also four BBA members who are mentors for BDL. These mentors spend one to two hours a week supporting a debate team in a particular high school.

The BBA’s partnership with BDL fulfills three of the BBA’s many public service goals: 1)  using lawyering skills to make a significant impact on the Boston community, 2) providing BBA members with a meaningful volunteer opportunity, and 3) expanding the diversity pipeline into the legal profession.

2010 City Championship Brighton

Boston Debate League 2010 City Championship

We would like to thank our volunteers:

Mentors
Catherine Drislane (Boston Latin Academy)
Greg Peterson (Charlestown)
Jessica Block ( EMK High School)
Stephanie Hoelplinger ( Irving Middle School)

Judges
Allison Hynes
Angelo Guisado
Ashley Hayes
Camal Robinson
Caroline Hanania
Christina Miller
Courtney Zhou
Deborah Goddard
Edmond Ford
Elizabeth Ybarra Crean
Erica Carroll
Fran Sheehan
Heather Sit
Jacqueline Delbasty
Jacquelyn Redmond
Jesse Grove
Jonathan Driscoll
Kathleen Micciche
Kerlin Jean-Louis
Kyu Cho
Lei Reilley
Mark Zglobicki
Michael Boudett
Michael Dsida
Michael Sugar
Natalie Galley
Nina Mathur
Rachna Mathur
Reidan Fredstrom
Robert Ullmann
Ryan Mulloy
Shannon Dale
Stephen Marsters
Tarae Howell
Vickie Henry
William Fitzpatrick

For more information about volunteering or the program, please contact Katie D’Angelo, Public Service Programs Coordinator, at kdangelo@bostonbar.org.

Public Service Year in Photos

In January 2012, the John & Abigail Adams Benefit raised over $600,000. That amount helped to fund grants to 24 Massachusetts community organizations providing legal services in areas such as immigration, domestic violence and homelessness.

Volunteer lawyers and law students help unrepresented tenants and landlords with a range of services, from information, and advice for full representation in eviction proceedings.  Since May 1999, an estimated 12,000 volunteers have assisted more than 14,700 individuals. Joanna Allison Staff Attorney at the Volunteer Lawyers Project and Chris Saccardi, Law Office of Christopher T. Saccardi at the Boston Housing Court.

At the BBA Lawyer for a Day in the Boston Housing Court, volunteer lawyers and law students helped unrepresented tenants and landlords with a range of services — from information and advice to full representation in eviction proceedings. Since May 1999, an estimated 12,000 volunteers have assisted more than 14,700 individuals. Joanna Allison Staff Attorney at the Volunteer Lawyers Project and Chris Saccardi, Law Office of Christopher T. Saccardi at the Boston Housing Court.

Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley spoke to East Boston High School students as part of the M. Ellen Carpenter Financial Literacy Program, a joint program of the Boston Bar Association and the U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley spoke to East Boston High School students as part of the M. Ellen Carpenter Financial Literacy Program, a joint program of the Boston Bar Association and the U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

Emily Hodge, Choate, Hall & Stewart, teaches students about the importance of due process and access to justice at the Josiah Quincy Elementary School. In May 2012, 28 volunteers taught 580 students at 5 different schools about the field of law.

Emily Hodge, Choate, Hall & Stewart LLP, as part of Law Day in the Schools taught students about the importance of due process and access to justice at the Josiah Quincy Elementary School. In May 2012, 28 volunteers taught 580 students at 5 different schools about the field of law.

The Lawyer Referral Service (LRS), is the BBA’s largest public service program, with a specific commitment to reaching historically underserved populations. The LRS Program connects callers in need of legal assistance with qualified help from private attorneys, legal services agencies, government offices and community programs.

The Lawyer Referral Service (LRS), is the BBA’s largest public service program, with a specific commitment to reaching historically underserved populations. The LRS Program connects callers in need of legal assistance with qualified help from private attorneys, legal services agencies, government offices and community programs.

In its ninth year of producing young public interest leaders, the Public Interest Leadership Program selected an outstanding class of 14 up-and-coming leaders from the largest-ever applicant pool. The 2012-2013 class of the BBA's Public Interest Leadership Program. L-R: Omar F. Gonzalez-Pagan, Staci Rubin, Benton B. Bodamer, Christopher T. Saccardi, Eric A. Haskell, Julia E. Devanthéry, Jacqueline Silva Anchondo, Emily F. Hodge, Meghan D. H. Walsh Raquel Webster and Daniel M. Routh

In its ninth year of producing young public interest leaders, the Public Interest Leadership Program selected an outstanding class of 14 up-and-coming leaders from the largest-ever applicant pool. The 2012-2013 class of the BBA’s Public Interest Leadership Program. L-R: Omar F. Gonzalez-Pagan, Staci Rubin, Benton B. Bodamer, Christopher T. Saccardi, Eric A. Haskell, Julia E. Devanthéry, Jacqueline Silva Anchondo, Emily F. Hodge, Meghan D. H. Walsh Raquel Webster and Daniel M. Routh.

The Mayor’s Youth Council, a partnership between the BBA, Mayor’s Office and Northeastern University, gives young people the opportunity to reach out to other Boston teens. The BBA provides the Mayor’s Youth Council lawyer-mentors. Lisa Goodheart, Past President of the BBA with Mayor Thomas M. Menino at the 2012 Mayor’s Youth Council Reception at Northeastern University.

The Mayor’s Youth Council, a partnership between the BBA, the Mayor’s Office and Northeastern University, gives young people the opportunity to reach out to other Boston teens. The BBA provides the Mayor’s Youth Council lawyer-mentors. Lisa Goodheart, Past President of the BBA with Mayor Thomas M. Menino at the 2012 Mayor’s Youth Council Reception at Northeastern University.

Larry DiCara, a partner at Nixon Peabody and former member and president of the Boston City Council conducts a mock City Council hearing with the 2012 Summer Jobs students. L-R: Tatenda Mundeke, Aubrey Griffin, Raymond Cen, Ashley Dixon, and Samantha Argon.

Larry DiCara, a partner at Nixon Peabody and former President of the Boston City Council conducted a mock City Council hearing with the 2012 Summer Jobs students. L-R: Tatenda Mundeke, Aubrey Griffin, Raymond Cen, Ashley Dixon, and Samantha Argon.

At the 4th Annual Pro Bono Fair for Attorneys and Law Students sponsored by BBA and the Rappaport Center for Law and Public Service, Sarah Sherman-Stokes of the Political Asylum/Immigration Representation Project, a Boston Bar Foundation Grantee, explains the pro bono opportunities available in Greater Boston.

At the 4th Annual Pro Bono Fair for Attorneys and Law Students sponsored by BBA and the Rappaport Center for Law and Public Service, Sarah Sherman-Stokes of the Political Asylum/Immigration Representation Project, a Boston Bar Foundation Grantee, explained the pro bono opportunities available in Greater Boston.

BBA President James D. Smeallie talks to 8th and 9th graders at Quincy Upper School during the Principal for A Day program on Tuesday, November 13th. The program allowed public and private sector leaders to better understand the improvements and remaining challenges in the Boston public school system.

BBA President James D. Smeallie talked with 8th and 9th graders at Quincy Upper School during the Principal for A Day program on Tuesday, November 13th. The program allowed public and private sector leaders to better understand improvements and remaining challenges in the Boston public school system.

Steve Stein, Executive Director of Boston Debate League conducts a training for BBA volunteers to be judges at debate tournaments. The BBA entered a partnership with Boston Debate League earlier this year.

Steve Stein, Executive Director of Boston Debate League trained BBA volunteers to be judges at debate tournaments. The BBA entered into a partnership with Boston Debate League earlier this year.

BBA Past President Renee Landers (Suffolk Law School) presented GLAD Civil Rights Project Director Mary Bonauto and Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley with the Beacon Award honoring Diversity & Inclusion for their work as lawyers in advancing same sex marriage. The Boston Bar Association’s third annual Beacon Award for Diversity & Inclusion took place on November 13 at the Liberty Hotel in Boston.

BBA Past President Renee Landers (Suffolk Law School) presented GLAD Civil Rights Project Director Mary Bonauto and Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley with the Beacon Award honoring Diversity & Inclusion for their work as lawyers in advancing same sex marriage. The Boston Bar Association’s third annual Beacon Award for Diversity & Inclusion took place on November 13 at the Liberty Hotel in Boston.

Three Ways to Give Back

In this season of reflection and gratitude, many people look for ways to give back. Here are a few upcoming opportunities to get more involved in the community:

(1)    Participate in the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program and help low and moderate-income taxpayers fill out tax returns and offer consultations on special credits, such as Earned Income Tax Credit, Child Tax Credit, and Credit for the Elderly. You can learn more about how to get involved at the upcoming VITA information session.

(2)    Teach high school students across Massachusetts about making informed and effective decisions regarding their finances through educational and experiential opportunities in the M. Ellen Carpenter Financial Literacy program. You can teach students about credit cards, checking accounts, budgeting, and more.

(3)    Hire a local high school student for an 8-week internship at your law firm through our Summer Jobs program.  Help students learn about the field of law and gain career experience.

Visit the Public Services Programs page to learn about additional opportunities in the community. For more information on the programs, please contact Katie D’Angelo, Public Service Programs Coordinator at 617-778-1914 or kdangelo@bostonbar.org.

A View into the Boston Public Schools

Experiencing a day in the shoes of a Boston public school principal has become a tradition for Boston Bar Association Presidents. Since 2004, the BBA president has participated in the Principal for a Day program run by Boston Plan for Excellence (BPE). The Program allows public and private sector leaders to better understand the improvements and remaining challenges in the Boston public school system.

Furthermore, it provides the basis for the types of relationships between the business community and the local school system that can help improve the schools. President James D. Smeallie participated in BPE’s’ annual Principal for a Day Program on Tuesday, November 13th, shadowing the co-headmasters of the Quincy Upper School.

BBA President J.D. Smeallie talking to 8th and 9th graders at the Quincy Upper School.

“After a morning at the Josiah Quincy School, what struck me was how genuinely enthusiastic the co-headmasters were in the face of poor facilities, budget constraints and a talent drain to the exam schools,” said Smeallie. “If their ideas and strategies are indicative of our public schools as a whole, there is a tremendous amount of effort and creativity directed toward improving our city’s schools.”

Smeallie had the opportunity to review test results with teachers, meet with the principal and administrative staff, participate in a student government meeting, visit classrooms, and debrief with a teacher after a lesson. Following the morning activities,  all 2012 participants ended the day with a lunchtime discussion at Bank of America with a representative from the Mayor’s office, Bank of America Chairman Emeritus and BPE Board of Trustees Chair Chad Gifford, BPE Executive Director Jesse Solomon, Boston School Committee Chair, Reverend Gregory Groover, and Superintendent Carol Johnson.

Co-Headmaster Richard Chang, BBA President J.D. Smeallie, Steven Wright, and Co-Headmaster Stephen Cirasuolo

During time in the schools, Smeallie gained a personal look at the impact of the BBA’s public service programs on the Boston school system. These school-based programs, which include the M. Ellen Carpenter Financial Literacy Program, Law Day in the Schools, Mayor’s Youth Council, Summer Jobs Program, and the Boston Debate League, provide students with real world professional skills to increase their involvement in their communities and prepare them for future careers and higher education opportunities. To cite just one benefit, Smeallie explained that all of the students involved in the BBA’s Boston Debate League program from Quincy Upper School continue on to college and receive scholarships.

For more information about public service opportunities in the Boston public schools, please review our 2012 Public Service Report or contact Katie D’Angelo at kdangelo@bostonbar.org.

The Fight Starts Somewhere

On November 13, the Boston Bar Association will have the honor of presenting its third annual Beacon Award for Diversity and Inclusion to Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders (GLAD)  and the Massachusetts Office of the Attorney General (AG). They will be honored for their work in advancing marriage equality, a civil rights battle thathas its origins well before DOMA. But more on that in a moment.

The combined efforts of both GLAD and the AG’s Office have brought together an impressive network of lawyers to advance one of the most significant civil rights issues in recent history.  What’s particularly meaningful for us is that the two honorees engaged the legal community as an advocate for greater Diversity and Inclusion both in Massachusetts and the nation.

This fight for civil rights for gay and lesbian couples in Massachusetts could be seen in a fundamental way as starting with a single pro bono case from the mid ‘80’s,  Babets v. Johnston. It began with The Boston Globe breaking a story about two brothers in the foster care system placed with a gay couple, Babets and Jean. The very same day the story broke, the Dukakis administration removed the children from their home.

The couple’s sexual orientation was the sole reason the boys were removed from their home. No issues of neglect, abuse, or any sort of mistreatment were ever raised. After the children were removed, the administration approved a new DSS policy that essentially banned gays and lesbians from being foster parents.

From GLAD Website: Don Babets and David Jean (back) with
GLAD attorney and Executive Director Kevin Cathcart (r) and co-counsel Tony Doniger
Photo by Ellen Shub

Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders started the legal fight to overturn this blatantly discriminatory policy and return the boys to their home. Today, there would be lawyers lining up around the block to help fight for this family, but in 1986, GLAD found it nearly impossible to find any support in the legal community. Attorney Anthony M. Doniger, a partner at Sugarman, Rogers, Barshak & Cohen, P.C. – later to become President of the Boston Bar Association –stepped up to the challenge and represented the plaintiffs in the case pro bono all the way up to the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. The court rejected the claim of executive privilege asserted by the Dukakis administration in order to withhold documents related to the DSS policy banning gay and lesbians from being foster parents. This ruling allowed the plaintiffs to move forward on their suit to reverse the policy. The policy was ultimately reversed back to the “best interests of the child” standard and the initial suit was settled out of court.

The Beacon Award is celebrating the great work GLAD and the AG’s office have done to promote marriage equality not only in the Commonwealth, but across the nation. Every civil rights effort begins with small steps that, like pebbles dropped in a pond, send out ripples that ultimately can have profound impact.  The Babets v. Johnston case is just one of those “pebbles” dropped just over 25 years ago.

Please join us on November 13 at 6:00 at the Liberty Hotel for the Beacon Award.  The event is free but we do ask that you RSVP.

Bidding Farewell to the 2012 Summer Jobs Program

As the warm and bright summer days are slowly turning into longer autumn months, the BBA’s Summer Jobs Program has come to an end.  The Summer Jobs Program is a diversity and inclusion pipeline program with the goal of introducing Boston Public School students to the law and the legal profession.  During the 8 week employment program the students also participated in an enrichment component.   Students chosen for the Program are motivated and high-achieving students with their eyes set on college and hopefully, after participating in this Program, the legal profession.   Last Thursday, Holland & Knight generously opened their doors to our 55 Summer Jobs students, their family members and firm sponsors for our annual Graduation Ceremony.   It was a packed house – as speakers including keynote, Steven Wright, Executive Partner of Holland & Knight, BBA President, Lisa Goodheart and BBA President Elect, J.D. Smeallie help bid farewell to an impressive class of students.

 
In his keynote remarks, Mr. Wright urged the students to think about the “5 Rs – respect, resilience, resourcefulness, responsibility and the ability to take risks” as guiding principles for both their academic and professional careers.  His thoughtful advice encouraged the students to “develop a stakeholder’s group – the group of people that will help guide you through your career.” The keynote address was particularly significant for our students as they stand at the threshold of their young careers.

 

 
 In addition, two students, Stephane Alexandre, a student at Boston Latin Academy and an intern at Prince Lobel Tye and Raymond Cen, a student at Boston Latin School and an intern at Nixon Peabody shared their experiences in the Program.  Stephane said that during her internship she worked “alongside clerks, paralegals, and lawyers” and her duties included “informing the clients of the status of their cases and files.”  She also noted that she “had the opportunity to learn about affidavits and depositions, as well as the importance of time management, which is required to succeed in life.”

 
 Raymond spoke of establishing a strong working relationship with many employees at Nixon, including former Boston City Council President and Boston Latin School alum, Larry DiCara. He noted that “now, every time Larry sees me, he exclaims a Latin saying – ‘ad astra per aspera’ – to the stars through difficulties.”  Raymond said that “working at Nixon Peabody has given me a new perspective on the legal world. I consider my internship at Nixon Peabody one of the great experiences of my life and will truly miss working with the amazing people I have met.”

 
The Boston Bar Association would like to thank the following firms for their support of the Summer Jobs Program.  Without you, this Program and the opportunities it affords our students would not be possible.

Anderson & Kreiger LLP
Bingham McCutchen LLP
Boston Bar Association*
Burns & Levinson LLP*
Choate Hall & Stewart LLP
Chu, Ring & Hazel LLP
Collora LLP
Committee for Public Counsel Services*†
Cooley LLP
DLA Piper LLP- Boston Office
Donnelly, Conroy & Gelhaar, LLP
Donovan Hatem, LLP
Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP*
Ferriter Scobbo & Rodophele PC
Foley Hoag LLP
Goodwin Procter LLP
Hemenway & Barnes LLP
Hinckley, Allen & Snyder LLP
Holland & Knight, LLP
Massachusetts Executive Office of Health and Human Services†
Massachusetts Law Reform Institute†
Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo PC
Morrison Mahoney LLP
Nixon Peabody LLP
Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP
Office of the Corporation Counsel City of Boston*
Peabody & Arnold LLP
Pierce Atwood, LLP
Prince Lobel Tye LLP
Proskauer Rose LLP
Ropes & Gray LLP*
Shaevel and Krems
Sherin and Lodgen LLP
Shilepsky Hartley Robb Casey Michon LLP
Sovereign Bank
Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office*†
Suffolk University Law
Sugarman, Rogers, Barshak & Cohen, PC
Sunstein Kann Murphy & Timbers LLP
Todd & Weld LLP
United States Bankruptcy Court†
Verrill Dana LLP
Volunteer Lawyers Project of the Boston Bar Association *†
Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP
Wolf, Greenfield & Sacks, PC

*Hiring more than one student
† Position funded the by Boston Bar Foundation

We would also like to thank the volunteers that led the weekly enrichment seminars over the course of this summer. You have helped to broaden the experiences of our students.

Warren Agin, Swiggart & Agin, LLC
Hon. Peter Agnes, Massachusetts Appeals Court
Hon. Frank Bailey, U.S. Bankruptcy Court
Barbara Berenson, Supreme Judicial Court
Janet Bostwick, Janet E. Bostwick, PC
Jeanne Darcey, Sullivan & Worcester LLP
Lawrence DiCara, Nixon Peabody LLP
Hon. Joan Feeney, U.S. Bankruptcy Court
John Fitzgerald, Office of the U.S. Trustee
William Harrington, Office of the U.S. Trustee
Kathleen Henry, Plymouth Rock Assurance Corporation
Donald Lassman, Law Office of Donald R. Lassman
John Loughnane, Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC
Ben Loveland, Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP
David Mawhinney, U.S. Bankruptcy Court
Stacie McHale, U.S. Bankruptcy Court
John Morrier, Casner & Edwards, LLP
Vanessa Peck, Goulston & Storrs – A Professional Corporation
Kathleen Rahbany, Craig and Macauley Professional Corporation
Diane Rallis, Holland & Knight, LLP
Emmanuelle Renelique, Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP
Lynne Riley, Riley Law Group
Jeffrey Sternklar , Duane Morris LLP
Jillian Vorce, The Jillian Group

The Top 10 Reasons to be a Mentor to a Boston Public High School Debate Team

10. Boston high school debaters are amazing, dedicated kids.  They get up at 5 AM every school day, often taking multiple buses and trains to be in class by 7:15 AM.  Then they repeat that journey home to care for little brothers and sisters.  Sometimes their families have lived in Boston for generations.  Sometimes they are refugees from places like Somalia or Syria or Guatemala and act as interpreters for their parents.  They are intelligent.  Often highly intelligent.  Your time will be well spent.

9.  Many of these kids don’t start with the reading or analytical skills that their intelligence would suggest.  Many of them have a hard time pronouncing certain written words.  Debate and debate team practice is really a stealth way of tapping kids’ competitive drive so they want to internalize critical skills:  reading, understanding a text well enough to put it into their own words and metaphors, speaking fluently, having confidence that their evidence-backed views deserve to be heard, using math practically to estimate, breaking a problem down into its components, looking into the eyes of those they are speaking to.  You know how to do this cold.  Pass it on.

8.  Do you really think the teachers who are coaches can do this all by themselves?  They start work at 6 AM.  They work 11 hour days.  Over 100 college-educated adults are needed to judge each debate round of 400 kids at a single tournament.  Coaches are pressed into emergency service as judges, taking them away from their teams.  Some tournament weekends they have competing family needs.  These teacher-coaches need backup!

7. Every teacher I’ve met says that the Boston Debate League is the single best program in the Boston Public School system, hands down.  The “single best program in the Boston Public School system, hands down,” needs you.  Let it go to your head!

6.  Teaching a pack of high school boys, at their request, how to tie their own ties:  Be. The. Man.     

5.  When was the last time you walked into a room of clients and they shouted:  “Where have you been???  We missed you!!!” ?

4. You will never get lost driving around Eastie or Brighton or Dorchester again.

3.  Your parents came to your games in high school, right?  Their parents often can’t because they are working to make ends meet and can’t afford the time or the money to travel by mass transit to tournaments.  If you aren’t there, it is quite possible no one will be.  Who will explain judges’ comments?  Who will celebrate their triumphs?  Who will just be there as they experience defeat and figure out how to come back?  (A teenager who has just lost a debate round and asks for your advice really, really wants to hear it.)

2.  Where do you think the next generation of DAs, public defenders, judges, transactional lawyers, entrepreneurs, governors and presidents are going to come from?  Are you bothered by the increasing income and opportunity gap in America?  Well, here’s your chance to do something about it.  Urban education is the civil rights issue of our time. 

1.  Participation in the Boston Debate League is transformational.  The shy kids talk.  The class talkers listen.  Reading and thinking skills grow. Work and preparation habits put down roots.  It becomes cool to be smart and persuasive. College doors open.  Go ahead — get in touch with your inner miracle worker!

Greg Peterson is a real estate and environmental partner at Tarlow, Breed, Hart & Rodgers, P.C. in Boston.  He is listed in Best Lawyers in America and ranked in Chambers, U.S.A..  During the October, 2011 – March, 2012 Boston Debate League season he served as volunteer mentor to the Charlestown High School debate team.  He is looking forward to the 2012-13 BDL season.

BBA Summer Jobs Program: A Summer of Learning

 

Next week, the Boston Bar Association’s Summer Jobs Program  — a key diversity and inclusion pipeline initiative — will kick off with coffee, muffins and remarks from Mayor Thomas M. Menino and Chief Justice Roderick L. Ireland.  The Program, which began in 1993 with just 16 students from Boston’s public high school, will welcome a record-breaking 55 students this year.  The program allows law firms, law offices, and legal departments to invest in the future of our city – by drawing upon the talents of an ethnically and racially diverse group of teens from Boston’s neighborhoods.

The Summer Jobs Program is not simply an employment opportunity for students, but an enrichment experience – with a strong focus on education.  Students in the program attend weekly seminars on rights and responsibilities in the workplace, civic responsibility, and the judicial system.

Students will also participate in the M. Ellen Carpenter Financial Literacy Program, a joint venture of the BBA and the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Massachusetts. Led by seasoned bankruptcy attorneys, the financial literacy training focuses on personal finance and budgeting, using credit, and financing a car. The finale is held at the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, where students participate in a mock bankruptcy hearing and have the opportunity to speak with a Bankruptcy Judge.

Other educational events lined up for the students include a mock City Council hearing to be led by former City Council President, Lawrence S. DiCara at Boston City Hall, a tour of the Adams Courthouse and Supreme Judicial Court, and sessions on the legal implications of file-sharing,  and understanding the college admissions process.

Beyond the Billable reached out to Anthony Betances, a 2011 participant to find out what he thought about the enrichment program.

Anthony Betances,
2011 Summer Jobs Participant

My favorite seminar took place at the U.S. Bankruptcy Court.  The reason it was my favorite was because it put into practice many of the things that we had already heard about in the past seminars.  We already knew that irresponsible spending could carry serious consequences, and we had been given some information on bankruptcy, but the unfolding of the process in front of our very own eyes had more of an impact.  All of a sudden, someone spending $40,000 or so but getting hit with more than $80,000 in fees and interest became more real, as did the possibility of buying a car and getting into more debt than that new car is even worth.  It really just showed how ridiculous and reckless things can get if you’re not proactive about, and conscious of, your financial life.

 

The Summer Jobs Program is a longstanding collaboration of the Boston Bar Association, the City of Boston, and the Boston Private Industry Council (PIC).  The students are high school rising juniors, seniors and college freshmen, with some work and volunteer experience.  All participants completed an application, provided at least two letters of recommendation, and submitted an essay explaining why they want to participate in this program.  The students are high-achievers with their eyes set on college.  For many of the students, this program will be their first exposure to law as a profession.

Through generous funding from the Boston Bar Foundation’s M. Ellen Carpenter Fund and the Austin P. Jones Fund, 10 students will hold positions in legal services agencies, government and court offices.  All of the enrichment seminars are led by BBA volunteers. 

 

BBA Connects with Boston’s Young Leaders

Lisa Goodheart, President of the BBA with Mayor Thomas M. Menino at the 2012 Mayor’s Youth Council Reception at Northeastern University.

Beyond the Billable recently attended a reception at Mayor Menino’s 2012 reception for the Mayor’s Youth Council (MYC). Over the years the BBA has provided mentors for this initiative, and we chatted with two of them to find out how they feel about donating their time to the MYC.  Here’s what we learned.

The BBA first became involved in what would become the Mayor’s Youth Council in 1990 through its predecessor, the Mayor’s Youth Leadership Corps.  The Corps represented a public-private partnership among the City of Boston, the BBA and Northeastern University.  The aim of the program was multifold – to show Boston youth how the city and its’ many institutions worked, to develop leadership, encourage community service and promote personal growth in today’s young people.  The foundations of the MYC reside firmly in roots of the Mayor’s Youth Leadership Corps.

Since 1994, the BBA has been proud to provide the MYC with lawyer-mentors. In addition to attending bi-monthly meetings at Boston City Hall, the mentors guide students through their program goals and help develop their skills in a variety of different capacities – including executing and leading meetings.  Here at Beyond the Billable, we wanted to find out from our mentors what it means to give their time to the MYC.

Edmund J. Gorman, Law Office of Edmund J. Gorman

Tonight, I begin my 8th year as a BBA mentor for the MYC.  I     participate because I support the BBA’s focus on helping Boston’s kids.  Also, I like to think that my service honors the men and women who mentored me at a time when a professional career was anything but a certainty.

Our role as BBA mentors has numerous facets.  Each year, the MYC representatives identify an issue or two that are important to their lives as teenagers. e.g., school nutrition, public safety and violence prevention, civility on the “T,” substance abuse, summer jobs, and after-school programs. With the help of the Mayor’s staff, the kids then design a program to learn more about the issues and to share what they’ve learned by “outreach” to their peers at schools, neighborhood libraries, and recreation centers. The mentors assist the MYC’s planning by steering the discussions to focus on the specific issue and goal.  Sometimes, we ask questions to generate more thinking and discussion while at other times we try to answer questions, especially when the roles of law and government are pertinent.

Occasionally, we share an anecdote to illustrate a point.  For example, a few kids scoffed at the notion of teens taking a minimum wage or no-pay summer job.  I explained that I began working at 16 years old for $1.60 per hour.  That employer is now a major client and I believe I was selected as its counsel in part because I had swept the floors. I also related how I volunteered many after-school hours working on a recycling program for my hometown, which in turn was the seed for a lifelong interest and career in environmental law.  They now understand that our journeys begin with small steps.

Neil Austin, Foley Hoag LLP

I participate in Mayor’s Youth Council as a means to engage publicly with Boston-area high school students (a portion of the city’s population with which I would otherwise have little interaction) and to be a resource to those students as they embark upon their college years and begin to think about what they want to do with their lives.

The Mayor’s Youth Council has a lot in common with the BBA’s Public Interest Leadership Program.  It is a year-long program made up of members selected after a competitive application process.  The key goals of Mayor’s Youth Council are to foster leadership among its members and to serve as a vehicle for outreach to the larger community of high school students in Boston.  In addition to attending regular meetings, MYC members are involved in planning and carrying out a limited number of projects through the year (for example, this year, the Council conducted a resume workshop).

Being a mentor is a rewarding and low-stress activity that involves attending the bi-monthly Council meetings at City Hall and facilitating debate and discussion among Council members regarding issues affecting youth in the City of Boston.  Outside of regularly-scheduled meetings, mentors are often involved in facilitating the Council’s special projects.  This year, I attended the resume-writing workshop with another BBA volunteer and provided tips and feedback to high school students preparing resumes for summer jobs and college admissions. 

The MYC consists of 36 students selected to represent their neighborhoods as volunteers on this citywide board.  Many of these young leaders are selected to participate in the BBA Summer Jobs Program. Each class of the Council establishes an annual program agenda and works to meet these goals throughout the year.  The 2011-2012 MYC class focused on issues of education, health, youth development, neighborhood safety, environment and communications.  They held meetings with community leaders including the Executive Director of the Boston Youth Fund to discuss Boston’s teen job strategy and a representative from the Boston Police Department to address concerns regarding healthy and positive youth and police partnerships.

BBA Summer Jobs Widens the Pipeline

Imagine that you are a high school student again. You have nearly completed your sophomore, junior or senior year.  You are a student in one of the 28 high schools in Boston.   You might be a freshly minted graduate, ready to enter college in the fall. You come from one of the 21 diverse Boston neighborhoods.   In addition to English, you may speak Spanish, Vietnamese, Haitian Creole, Chinese or one of the 77 home languages spoken by Boston Public Schools students.   You decide to apply and are accepted to the Boston Bar Association’s Summer Jobs Program.

Since 1993, the BBA has introduced over 300 young adults to the legal profession.  This year, the Program will provide 56 students with positions in area law firms, legal offices, government and legal services agencies.  This represents a record-breaking number of participants.   Summer Jobs interns represent a motivated and high-achieving group of students in Boston. 

As we enter the 19th year of the Program, Beyond the Billable wanted to reach out to some of Program alumni – to find out where they are now, how they got there and what their experiences as Summer Jobs interns meant for them.   These are their stories. 

Khimmara Greer

Khimmara Greer, Esq.

Contract Attorney

Summer Jobs Program – 1999

I grew up in Dorchester. I attended John D. O’Bryant High School in Roxbury and Regis College in Weston. After graduating from college, I worked at WGBH for three years. Becoming an attorney was always a dream of mine, so I decided to pursue my dreams and entered North Carolina Central University School of Law, located in Durham, NC, in the fall of 2008. I graduated law school in May 2011 and passed the NC bar in July 2011. Since graduating from law school, I have been working as a temporary document review contract attorney on various litigation projects, and continue to seek permanent employment.

Bingham McCutchen, LLP, formerly Bingham Dana, LLP, was the law firm I interned at in the summer of 1999. The most important thing I learned throughout my internship was how to conduct myself in a professional environment. This was my first exposure to the corporate world, as it is for many of the students who participate in the Program, and it laid a solid foundation that I have built on over the past few years. While in college, I was an Inroads intern for three summers (interned at Blue Cross Blue Shield of MA and Fidelity Investments for two summers) and I felt like I was a few steps ahead of some of my colleagues because of my experience as a BBA Summer Intern.

My favorite memory from the Program was being selected as the female student to give a speech at the end of summer graduation. I felt very honored and was very nervous at the same time, but it was a great learning experience for me and gave me the opportunity to work on my public speaking skills. I still have the picture I took with Mayor Menino and the male student speaker. It is a good reminder of how far I have come.

There are many benefits to having a teen in the office. However, in my opinion, the most important benefit is an opportunity for attorneys and their staff to give back to the community by mentoring teens in the community through the BBA Summer Program both directly and indirectly. Giving back to the community is extremely important because positively influencing the lives of teens assist in creating well-rounded adults, and the next generation of professionals.

My experience as a BBA Summer Intern helped me to become an even more diligent student. I admired the attorneys throughout my summer internship and was inspired by their accomplishments, which made me work even harder. One of my goals was to be in their shoes one day, to become a successful attorney, and I continue to persistently work towards that goal.  

Chioma with her father at the Boston College Law School graduation

Chioma Akukwe

Boston College Law School Class of 2012

Summer Jobs Program – 2000

My name is Chioma Akukwe. I recently graduated from Boston College Law School this May, and hope to practice as a litigator here in MA. As a Brighton High School student, I avoided destructive behavior common among inner city youth because of the outreach programs led by lawyers and judges of the Commonwealth. It all started with the BBA Summer Jobs Program.

During my sophomore year in high school, I participated in the Boston Bar Association (BBA) Summer Jobs Program, where I was introduced to the legal profession and the idea of law school as an attainable and attractive goal. While at the BBA Summer Jobs Program, I interned at Rackemann, Sawyer and Brewster.

Thanks to outreach programs like the BBA Summer Jobs Program, I experienced extensive legal-career-related tasks by the young age of 16. I also acquired career role models such as Chief Judge Wolf, who has served as my mentor throughout college and law school. My experience with outreach programs in high school played a critical role in my ultimate decision to go to law school.

I attribute my success at the College of the Holy Cross and Boston College Law School to the public interest lawyers who were determined to make a difference by introducing disadvantaged Boston youth to the inner workings of the justice system.

After my 1L year, I interned at Microloan Foundation (MLF), an organization that helps disenfranchised African women provide basic necessities for their families by giving them small loans to start businesses. I participated in the Boston College Law School’s London Semester Externship Program during the second semester of my 2L year. The externship part of my semester in London took place at Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP, a large firm in London. When I returned from London, I spent my 2L summer working for the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Commercial Law Development Program (CLDP).

Since my summer with the BBA Program, I have grown to be confident, hard-working, professional and dependable. Having a BBA Summer Program Student at a law firm is not only beneficial to the student, it can also be a rewarding experience for a mentoring attorney. It is a chance to play a positive role in a teenager’s life, and possibly help shape them into a responsible adult. I am a living proof.

Emmanuelle speaking at the 2010 BBA Law Day Dinner about her experience in the Summer Jobs Program

Emmanuelle Renelique

Legal Secretary, WilmerHale

Summer Jobs Program – 2003

The most valuable things I learned during my Summer Jobs opportunity with the Boston Bar Association was the importance of good work ethic and the benefits of networking. I was a high school student who had never worked in an office until I started at Ferriter Scobbo & Rodophele.  I was challenged to perform important tasks in a fast paced environment and quickly learned how crucial it was to ask questions when I did not understand something. The attorneys and staff were very gracious and appreciative when I asked questions as it demonstrated my enthusiasm as well as good judgment in wanting to complete the task well. I also learned the importance of networking. The working relationships I established through the Boston Bar Summer Jobs resulted in many great mentors and friends. My favorite memories from program were the visiting the various courthouses and attending my first Red Sox game!

While Summer Jobs students usually have minimal office experience, they are chosen form a select pool of applicants. Law firms certainly benefit from their zeal and energy. In my opinion and based on my work with other BBA Summer Jobs students, I was able to see the great benefits in having these students exposed to a law office. In addition to the proactive and inquisitive nature of these students, they are also able to seamlessly grasp the technology given the fact that they are “digital natives.” Their creative input could prove to enhance working systems and productivity.

The BBA Summer Jobs program definitely affirmed my decision to pursue of a legal career. As an intern, I had first-hand exposure to corporate law firm culture and the working environment. The experience aided me in obtaining other internships while attending the George Washington University. While GWU, presented many internship opportunities to students, I believe my Boston Bar Summer Jobs experience gave me a competitive edge in the applicant pool.