Posts Categorized: Pro Bono

BBA Hosts Unemployment Benefits Training for Prospective Volunteers

Learn a new skill while doing good! On Wednesday, May 30th, the BBA will host a pro bono training session, “Donate Your Time: Represent Claimants Seeking Unemployment Benefits.”   Taught by experts from the Volunteer Lawyers Project of the Boston Bar Association (VLP) and Greater Boston Legal Services (GBLS), the training will guide attorneys through the complexities of the unemployment system and provide them with the information needed to represent clients at unemployment benefits hearings.  Trained volunteers will support the Pro Bono Unemployment Project, a joint initiative of VLP and GBLS.

For an insider’s preview of the Pro Bono Unemployment Project, Beyond the Billable reached out to Lynn Girton, Chief Counsel at VLP and Monica Halas, senior attorney at GBLS to learn more about what the Project accomplishes, what attorney-volunteers can expect when they donate their time, and what difference volunteers make for the clients in these cases.   

Q: What is the mission of the Pro Bono Unemployment Project?

A: Unemployed low income workers and their families need legal representation to obtain Unemployment Insurance (UI) and job training benefits.  As individuals who are unemployed cannot afford to retain the services of the private bar, pro bono representation is critical to meet this serious and largely unmet need.  Data accumulated nationally demonstrates that employers are four times as likely to be represented as claimants, and yet, when represented, claimants have a 30% greater chance of recovery.

UI benefits are a significant source of income for our clients.  The maximum benefit is currently $653 a week plus an additional $25 a week per dependent (although capped at 50% of the unemployment check).  In addition, those families whose income is 400% of poverty or less (all of our clients) are also eligible to participate in a health insurance program.  As low wage employers increasingly offer no health insurance benefits, coupled with the new health care mandate, this is an important opportunity to provide a low income family with access to non-emergency, preventative care. 

UI benefits are critical to keeping families out of poverty.  Estimates from the Congressional Budget Office suggest that the receipt of UI benefits prevents up to 25% additional families from falling below the poverty line. During this economic recession where there are 6 applicants for every job, UI benefits – coupled with opportunities for job training to secure reemployment —  are more necessary than ever.

Q:  What is the time commitment and what type of support is provided to a volunteer?

A: These cases typically take no more than 10 to 15 hours of preparation (including the one hour hearing) and with experience, the time can be significantly reduced.  The area of the law is not complex, the issues are primarily fact-based, and a hearing decision is generally received within a couple of weeks. 

We have produced extensive training materials which we will provide t, we run periodic training for the bar in conjunction with the Volunteer Lawyers Project and we are also available to do a customized in-house two or three hour training at the convenience of any law firm that makes the request. By attending a training, attorneys are provided with  all the substantive legal information they need to know as well as procedural tips honed from our over thirty years of practice in this area, so lawyers are able to come up to speed very quickly.  The  GBLS Employment Law Unit is also available to answer any questions to help you in representing your clients.

Q: Can you share examples of how pro bono representation can have a significant impact on the outcome of a case?

A:  Client A

            The client worked as a cleaner. She developed health problems and her doctor instructed her not to mop floors anymore. She requested a transfer to a different floor where she would not have to mop. Such transfers had been given to other workers. The employer told the client that if she was unable to mop the floor, they did not need her any longer. The client applied for unemployment benefits and she was denied. She filed an appeal. She was represented by a VLP pro bono attorney at the hearing. Subsequently, the hearing officer reversed the determination and awarded the client all the unemployment benefits to which she was entitled.

 Client B

           This client worked as a direct care worker in a person’s home. The employer alleged that the client left the person unattended. The client said that he had left the person in the care of another person. The employer fired the client and he applied for unemployment benefits. He was denied. He filed an appeal and was subsequently represented at the hearing by a VLP pro bono attorney. The hearing officer reversed the determination and awarded the client all the unemployment benefits to which he was entitled.

If you would like to register for this training, please click here

BBA Business Lawyers Help Non-Profits I.D. Governance Pitfalls

Maribeth Perry, Executive Director of The Lawyers Clearinghouse speaking to attorney-volunteers.

In this competitive climate for funding, non-profits demonstrating sound management and controls will have a leg up over those raising red flags. Amid this backdrop, The Lawyers Clearinghouse –has launched a new Legal Assessment Program, and joined hands with the Business Law Public Service Committee of the Boston Bar Association to reach out to Boston Bar Foundation (BBF) Grantees and Grant applicants.

Managed by The Lawyers Clearinghouse, a grantee of the Boston Bar Foundation, the program provides a unique opportunity for BBA members to donate essential services to local non-profits.

“Many nonprofit leaders and staff spend their time running programs and providing direct services to their clients, often on a limited budget. This leaves little time and few resources to examine how the organization can run according to best practices.  The Legal Assessment Program provides a preventive “Legal Checkup” where lawyers review and evaluate the corporate governance of the nonprofit to ensure that the organization meets legal requirements in the conduct of its business, ultimately strengthening the non-profit.” Maribeth Perry, Executive Director, Lawyers Clearinghouse.

“This is a tremendous opportunity for corporate attorneys to put their transactional legal skills to good use, and also involves rare social contact with the wider corporate legal community.  This project permits attorneys from different firms and in-house counsel from different companies to team up on a single project.” –Ben Bodamer, Senior Associate, Weil, Gotshal & Manges, LLP, BBA Business Law Public Service Committee Co-Chair. 

If you have questions regarding the Legal Assessment Program, please contact Machiko Sano Hewitt at 617 778-1980 or [email protected]

 

Unwavering Dedication

Housing Court

Joanna Allison Staff Attorney at the Volunteer Lawyers Project and Chris Saccardi, Law Office of Christopher T. Saccardi. (Photo Credit Eric Fullerton)

When you arrive at the Boston Bar Association Housing Court Lawyer for the Day (“Housing Court”) on Thursday, one thing you can be sure of is that Attorney Chris Saccardi will be there. Since 2009, Chris has donated his time every Thursday to assist unrepresented landlords and tenants on Eviction Day. As he gained more experience and knowledge, he began to take pro bono cases for full representation and eventually focused his private practice in the area of landlord/tenant law. Chris’ consistent presence has led to him being the go-to private attorney for recruiting and supervising other attorneys in the project.

We reached out to Chris to find out — why he donates his time to this Program, what some of his most meaningful memories are as a volunteer and asked him to share any tips for new volunteers.

Why does he give his time?

A significant majority of the people we assist are low-income or disabled, frequently don’t speak English as their first language, and are often unable to afford counsel. They typically face a landlord represented by an experienced attorney and the stakes could not be higher – the potential loss of their home or their rent subsidy. I think that it is very important to try to level this playing field and I have found that a little bit of legal advice can make a big difference. I also enjoy meeting and working with a wide variety of attorneys from various types of practices. I have made a lot of lasting friendships that have been important to me both personally and professionally. Finally, I have learned a tremendous amount both by taking on challenging cases and by asking questions of more experienced attorneys. This knowledge has been immensely helpful to me in my own practice.

Chris’ most memorable experiences as a volunteer:

I have found my pro bono work at the Housing court extremely gratifying. I helped a woman with an extremely sick child stay in her apartment by explaining to the landlord that the reason for her missed rent payments was her preoccupation with the health of her daughter. By arranging for a payment plan and actively monitoring her progress, I was able to get her back on track and concentrate on supporting her daughter.

In another instance, I spoke with an elderly tenant early in the day and was able to intercept the opposing counsel before she requested a hearing in front of a judge, which would have likely not gone well for the tenant. Instead, we were able to work out a simple repayment agreement that satisfied both parties. The tenant was so happy that she actually grabbed me and gave me a hug after the agreement had been signed.

In another case, I spoke with a tenant who I quickly came to understand had exhausted her legal options and was likely to be evicted. I sat down with her and listened to her story and gave her some advice about options for requesting a bit more time from the judge before her inevitable move-out date. When we were finished speaking, I expected her to be depressed by the disheartening news I had just given her. Instead she gave me a big smile and thanked me for my time, saying that this had been the first time someone had actually sat down and took the time to listen to her. I continue to be amazed at how much of a difference a little advice or a few kind words can make to many of the litigants I speak to at the Housing Court.

 Chris’ advice to a new volunteer:

I would encourage them to participate! If they do, I suggest that they try to take as active a role as possible. While it may take a few sessions for new volunteers to start to feel knowledgeable, I suggest that they start talking to clients as soon as they can. There are always more experienced attorneys available to assist should a new attorney run into an issue with which they are not familiar. I suggest shadowing a more experienced attorney and attending a mediation, which is a great way to learn about the substantive housing issues in a typical case and to see first-hand how the procedures of the Housing Court play out.

If you are interested in becoming a volunteer, the Volunteer Lawyers Project in partnership with the Real Estate section of the Boston Bar Association will be having a training on “Trying a case in Boston Housing Court.” The esteemed panel includes the Honorable Jeffrey Winik, First Justice of the Boston Housing Court, Stefanie Balandis, Greater Boston Legal Services, Joanna Allison, Volunteer Lawyers Project and, of course, Chris Saccardi, the Law Office of Christopher T. Saccardi.

*There is no fee for this program, but we ask that attendees put their new skills to work by taking on a pro bono case through the Volunteer Lawyers Project.

To register for this training, please click here.

The Lawyer for the Day in Boston Housing Court is supported by the Herbert W. Vaughan Fund of the Boston Bar Foundation.