Posts Categorized: Lawyer Referral Service

Doing Justice

Guest Post submitted by: Steven Coren, Partner (Kerstein, Coren & Litchtenstein LLP). Attorney E. Steven Coren has more than 40 years of experience representing individuals and families in civil cases.

It’s not often attorneys can do justice while at the same time prevailing on a legal issue, particularly in a breach of privacy/emotional distress case. Recently, Attorney Steven Coren was able to accomplish both when a client was referred to Kerstein Coren & Lichtenstein LLP through the Boston Bar Association’s Lawyer Referral service. The client was a nurse at a major hospital who was hospitalized briefly in 2001 for psychiatric issues relating to her ailing marriage. She told a heart-rending tale that occurred in 2012 when she brought a post-divorce contempt action against her ex-husband over a parenting dispute involving their minor children.

During the contempt action, the sister-in-law of the plaintiff’s ex-husband accessed the plaintiff’s confidential 2001 psychiatric hospitalization records without the plaintiff’s knowledge or authorization and provided the records to the ex-husband. The sister-in-law accessed the records through her employment at a medical clinic.

The ex-husband orally communicated the contents of the plaintiff’s 2001 discharge diagnoses to a guardian ad litem (GAL), a psychotherapist appointed to investigate the parenting issue in the contempt proceeding. The ex-husband did not have the plaintiff’s consent or knowledge to obtain and communicate the information. The GAL wrote down the discharge diagnoses and included it in her report to the Court without the plaintiff’s knowledge or consent. As a Category F appointment, the GAL was required to obtain the plaintiff’s written consent to access this information and to notify the plaintiff of her intent to use it. The GAL did neither.

The plaintiff learned about the access to her confidential psychiatric records at a subsequent contempt hearing in open court. As a result of the invasion of her privacy, she was subjected to continuing embarrassment, horror, shame, anxiety, despair and dread. She also experienced physical symptoms including hair loss, lack of sleep and loss of appetite.

“I normally would not take a garden-variety HIPAA or infliction of emotional distress case because jury verdicts for emotional harm tend to be extremely low,” said Coren “However, I thought this case had great optics for building outrage among the jurors as the invasion of privacy and infliction of emotional distress were intentional on the part of the ex-husband and the sister-in-law, and the GAL’s conduct was unprofessional as well as illegal.” Coren admits he took the case with his heart as well as with his head. “I felt I could right a wrong as well as prosecute a legal claim for my client who could not afford to pay an attorney.” Coren agreed to take the case on a contingency agreement with no expectation that he would be compensated as there was no insurance available. “I feel that every so often it is my obligation as a legal professional to seek justice and help someone who cannot otherwise afford to pursue a claim.”

The defendants ignored all invitations to settle and a three-day jury trial was held in Boston Municipal Court in April 2019. The voir dire process was heavily utilized by Coren and was instrumental in selecting a jury that he felt was fair and impartial. The voir dire disclosed bias on the part of several prospective jurors due to the plaintiff’s psychiatric hospitalization, the reluctance of some to believe emotional distress had any monetary value and the insistence of some in applying a much higher standard than a preponderance of the evidence, and these jurors were struck for cause. Interestingly, Coren approved the inclusion of two ex-convicts on the jury during voir dire because he sensed empathy toward his client’s situation. During the damages phase of the trial, he emphasized to these jurors that fear, dread and anxiety are not controllable emotions and are very real to the person suffering from them.

At the conclusion of the trial, the jury found the sister-in-law and ex-husband acted intentionally in inflicting emotional distress and invading the plaintiff’s privacy. The jury found them and the GAL liable for damages, which totaled $92,800 – an extraordinary amount for emotional damages

The verdict by six citizens was an incredible validation to the plaintiff who endured years of litigation pursuing the case. Coren’s reward was seeing the tears of relief and the vindication on his client’s face. She is grateful to the Boston Bar Association for referring her to an attorney who stuck with her and made sure she got the justice she deserved.

Lawyer Referral Service Members Teach & Inspire New BBA Staff

Throughout the month of July, Lawyer Referral Service (LRS) panel attorneys volunteered their time to conduct training sessions on a variety of legal topics for new staff working in the BBA and especially our new intern for the LRS department. These trainings have been instrumental in helping our staff better understand the needs of attorneys we serve and ensuring we are conducting intake and screening calls efficiently to connect members of our community with the help they need.

This is what they had to say about the training sessions:

“The LRS Trainings were so insightful both to my experience here as the LRS Intern as well as for my future career goals. After hearing from attorneys about their specific practice area, I am able to give informed referrals to callers. Coming into this internship I knew that I had a passion for Civil Rights and Torts Law. However, I did not expect to find that I am also very interested in Employment and Consumer Law, something I may not have stumbled upon until much later in life. I am extremely grateful to have had the opportunity to speak with practicing attorneys and learn from them, not only about what they do on a day to day basis, but also their career journeys and personal interests. Each LRS training has been an inspiring moment that continuously reaffirmed my passion to pursue law school and a career in the legal field.”- Chandler Cofield

Chandler Cofield is working in the BBA Lawyer Referral Service for six months through Northeastern University’s Co-Op Program. Chandler is a fourth-year Sociology major with minors in Law & Public Policy and Human Communication.

“As the Section Programs Assistant, I have the opportunity to sit in meetings, conferences, and many different programs that are offered here at the BBA. As someone who has very limited knowledge on different areas of law, this can be intimidating and confusing. However, through the LRS trainings, I got to personally meet and talk with amazing practicing attorneys and learn so much about how the different types of law can be applied in everyday life. I have a passion for social justice and knowing your rights and how the law can work on your side is the best way to implement change.” – Jenna Kim

Jenna Kim is the BBA’s Section Programs Assistant, working to provide support to the Professional Development Department and our member attorneys.
(Pictured Above) LRS Attorney Jeremy Weltman conducting a training on Torts, Personal Injury, and Civil Rights to our intern Chandler Cofield.

The trainings were organized by the Boston Bar Association Lawyer Referral Service, the largest public service program of the Boston Bar Association, dedicated to helping members of the public in need of assistance connecting with attorneys.  We would like to thank the following attorneys who volunteered their time to conduct training sessions for the BBA’s new staff:

· Sara Attarchi (Simons Law Office) – Criminal Law
· Joel Davidson (Law Offices of Joel R. Davidson) – Social Security, Health, & Disability
· Morjieta Derisier (BayState Law Group, PLLC) – Landlord/Tenant & Real Estate
· Benjamin Duggan (KJC Law Firm LLC) – Employment Law
· Emily Amara Gordon (Amara Law, LLC) – Immigration Law
· Carolyn Martello Spaulding (Blake & Associates) – Trusts & Estates
· Daniel Occena (Occena Law P.C.) – Consumer Law & Bankruptcy Law
· Joana Stathi (Atwood & Cherny P.C.) – Family Law
· Jeremy Weltman (Hermes, Netburn, O’Connor & Spearig P.C.) – Torts, Personal Injury & Civil Rights

If you are interested in joining the BBA Lawyer Referral Service, or becoming involved in training sessions in the future, please contact Chane Vanes at [email protected]

Interested in Providing Legal Assistance to Military Members & Veterans?

The Military & Veterans Legal Helpline is a core part of the BBA’s ongoing efforts to provide access to justice and crucial legal assistance to military members, veterans, and their families. Each year, the helpline, which is housed in the BBA’s Lawyer Referral Service, receives hundreds of calls from this population, and refers individuals to attorneys offering reduced-fee legal services as well as other legal service programs.

Last year, nearly 500 calls and requests came to the helpline, and we are looking for more attorneys to assist this population in all areas of law. If you are an attorney interested in assisting by providing reduced-fee legal services, please contact Solana Goss, Lawyer Referral Service Manager, at [email protected] or 617-778-1978.

If you work with military service members, veterans, or family members of either group who are looking for legal assistance, please encourage them to call the Military & Veterans Legal Help Line housed at the Boston Bar Lawyer Referral Service at 617-742-0625 or 1-800-552-7046. Individuals can also get referrals 24/7 through our newly launched online platform, www.bostonbarlawyer.org.

Lawyer Referral Service Visits Cambridge Carnival

The BBA’s Lawyer Referral Service had a great afternoon tabling during the 26th Annual Cambridge Carnival International last Sunday!  It was a lively event full of dancing, music, great food, and fun times to celebrate Caribbean cultures rooted in African tradition.  Over 100,000 people come out each year making this the largest festival in Cambridge.

Sitting alongside other community organizations and vendors, we spread the word about our newly redesigned bostonbarlawyer.org, which anyone can use 24/7 to easily find an attorney who works in their needed area of law.  We also still have trained Lawyer Referral Specialists who can be reached at 617-742-0625 weekdays from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM who are ready to quickly connect callers with an attorney.

The LRS attends events like Cambridge Carnival every year to make the public more aware that our service is an available resource to help people find the legal representation they need, including at a reduced rate. We’re thankful for the Cambridge Carnival organizers for a fantastic afternoon.

If you’re an attorney interested in joining the Lawyer Referral Service, contact Solana Goss at [email protected] to find out more information.

LRS Co-op Intern, Jack Caplan, greets individuals interested in learning more about LRS.

Observations from Boston Housing Court’s Lawyer for the Day

 Guest Post: Jack Caplan is the current Lawyer Referral Service Co-op Intern at the BBA. Jack is a sophomore year at Northeastern University studying Politics, Philosophy, and Economics. After spending the morning shadowing the Lawyer for the Day table at Boston Housing Court, he shared his experience with Beyond the Billable.

Just after 9 am last Thursday morning in the Edward W. Brooke Courthouse in Boston, over 200 attorneys and members of the public crammed into one hot courtroom.  It was standing room only as people tried to find any space they could to claim as their own.  The physical bar which typically separates court observers from lawyers (the same bar from which the exam and Association get their names) was soon ignored, thus blurring the line between who’s an attorney and who isn’t.

The Clerk began calling out each case number and the respective plaintiffs and defendants answered with whether they wanted to try mediation or go straight to a bench trial.  Looking around the room you could see a microcosm of Boston itself: an MBTA driver searching for a seat before giving up and standing, much like her passengers at rush hour; a mother and father trying to quiet their young children with toys; and who EMT missed the first call of her case because of a last minute emergency at the end of a long night shift.  The atmosphere was understandably tense considering people’s homes were on the line, but the Clerk and Court Officer kept the mood light through jokes and banter.

A vast majority of those present elected to go to mediation and were directed to a lower floor of the sprawling Courthouse.  This sent them straight past the tables of the Volunteer Lawyers Project where landlords and tenants alike could stop by to ask questions, get help filing motions, and even get representation for mediation as part of a Limited Assistance Representation structure.  Attorneys were running around and talking to clients and the scene upstairs at the peak of the morning could only be described as chaotic.  But speaking with the volunteer attorneys it quickly became clear that they didn’t mind at all – in fact they loved it – their passion was palpable.  They had the chance to help out the roughly 95% of tenants who go into housing court without counsel.  Results for litigants with some level of representation are so vastly and almost unbelievably better than for those who go in totally alone.

Indeed, going to Housing Court while Lawyer for the Day is running can be one of the best antidotes to the otherwise negative feelings brought on by statistics like the one above.  It’s statistics like that, statistics which cast a tragic light on the state of justice in Massachusetts and America, which compel many of these attorneys to volunteer their time.  The impact that the dozen or so attorneys were able to make last week is truly a sight to behold.  Tenants who were convinced that they would lose their homes suddenly had hope provided by the attorneys.  The impact of donated time and expertise was noticed, appreciated, and sometimes immediate.

The Volunteer Lawyer’s Project administers frequent trainings for attorneys interested in helping out.  The Lawyer for the Day program itself occurs each Wednesday from 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM (public housing cases) and Thursday from 9:00 AM – 3:30 PM (private housing cases) in front of Courtroom 15 at the Edward W. Brooke Courthouse, 24 New Chardon Street, Boston, MA. If you have questions about volunteering or would like to learn more, please contact Cassandra Shavney the Boston Bar’s Public Service Programs Coordinator, or Milton Wong of the Volunteer Lawyers Project.

The need is constant, the difference is instant: consider volunteering today.

A Year in Photos – Public Service in 2017

From teaching a record 1,700 students through Law Day in the Schools to releasing a compelling report on criminal justice reform, 2017 was a successful year at the BBA. For highlights and our favorite photos from the year, read on to see how you and your colleagues contributed to our public service initiatives over the past year.

The 2017 Public Service Award presented at the Boston Bar Foundation’s annual John & Abigail Adams Benefit Ball honored Chief Justice Margaret H. Marshall in January. Chief Justice Marshall addresses the crowd at the Museum of Fine Arts, reminding every one of the importance of being good and just in their work.

MIT Bhangra, an award-winning dance group, entertained the crowd at the Adams Benefit. 2017’s Ball raised over $650,000 in support for local legal services organizations providing civil legal services to those in need. In June, the Foundation granted $960,000 to 20 such organizations.

Each January, hundreds of attorneys travel to the State House to Walk to the Hill for Civil Legal Aid. The Equal Justice Coalition coordinates this annual event to call on our legislators to adequately fund the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation through the state budget. Carol Starkey, 2016-2017 BBA President, highlights the importance of civil legal aid as noted in the BBA’s Investing in Justice report, which details that 2 out of 3 income eligible clients are turned away from legal services due to a lack of resources.

In response to President Trump’s Executive Order Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into the United States, then BBA President Carol Starkey reaffirmed the BBA’s aim to “support the rule of law, as well as the core values of access to justice and diversity and inclusion, which help keep the fundamental promise that all of us will enjoy due process and equal protection under the law.” Over the course of the year, the BBA worked with many legal services organizations to connect attorneys to volunteer opportunities. Political Asylum/Immigration Representation (PAIR) Project presented a number of Know Your Rights trainings for attorneys wishing to present to community groups about their immigration rights. Here, attorneys William Graves (Graves & Doyle) and Seth Purcell (PAIR Project) welcome over 60 attorneys to the first training at the BBA.

Paulette Brown (left, Locke Lord) accepts the Beacon Award for Diversity and Inclusion for her work as president of the American Bar Association convening the Diversity and Inclusion 360 Commission. One result of the Commission’s work was the passage at the ABA of Resolution 113, an initiative designed to increase diversity in the legal profession. In November of 2016, the BBA announced its strong support for the Resolution and is working with other partners in Boston on its implementation.

Raquel Webster (right, National Grid) introduces presenter Brian McLaughlin (McLaughlin Law) to a group of probationers at the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts. The BBA’s Reentry Education Program, which was developed by the Public Interest Leadership Program, engages with dozens of probationers annually on useful topics related to community reentry, including family law, reinstating a driver’s license, public benefits, and more.

Secretary Francisco A. Ureña (Massachusetts Department of Veterans’ Services) addresses the crowd at a Memorial Day reception hosted by the BBA’s Active Duty Military & Veterans Forum. The reception was held after the annual pro bono training for attorneys representing veterans in discharge upgrade cases. Since 2015, the BBA has worked with the Veterans Legal Clinic at the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School to hose these trainings to support their Veterans Legal Clinic.

One night a year, the BBA is transformed from a meeting space to a casino floor. Seventeen organizations sponsored this year’s Casino Night for Summer Jobs, the proceeds of which support the Summer Jobs Program and support internships for high school students at legal services organizations, government agencies, and courts. Attendees at Casino Night celebrate beating the house and eagerly await the mystifying reveal of a magic trick.

Law Day in the Schools, one of the BBA’s most popular volunteer opportunities, introduces Boston Public School students to the legal profession and particular areas of the law. This year, volunteers including Jill Brenner Meixel (left) and Allison Belanger (right) of Krokidas & Bluestein introduced students to due process and the importance of having fair rules and laws for all. There were a record 15 schools and over 1700 students in the program this year.

Throughout the year, the New Lawyers Section’s Public Service Committee coordinates volunteer events with organizations throughout the city. In addition to serving food at the Pine Street Inn, attorneys also helped sort donations at Cradles to Crayons, keep the esplanade clear at the Charles River Clean-up, and other important volunteer initiatives in the area.

High school students convene with Chief Justice Melvin S. Hoffman (U.S. Bankruptcy Court) after listing to a mock hearing in bankruptcy court. This session, which teaches students about the consequences of filing for bankruptcy is part of the M. Ellen Carpenter Financial Literacy Program, which began in 2005. Since it began, over 5800 students statewide have been introduced to the importance of budgeting, understanding credit, and financing a large purchase.

Over 1,000 attorneys came together for this year’s Law Day Dinner in Back Bay. Congressman Seth Moulton provided keynote remarks and highlighted the importance of lawyers and upholding the rule of law now more than ever.

This year’s Thurgood Marshall Award, honoring an attorney in private practice in Greater Boston for their extraordinary efforts in enhancing the human dignity of others by providing legal services to Massachusetts’ low income population, went to Elaine Blais (Goodwin). Blais volunteers with both the Political Asylum/Immigration Representation (PAIR) Project and Kids in Need of Defense (KIND) representing both children and adults in various immigration cases.

Anne Mackin (Greater Boston Legal Services) accepts the John G. Brooks Legal Services Award, an award presented to professional legal services attorneys for their outstanding work on behalf of indigent people in the Boston area. Mackin has worked in legal services for nearly 30 years, and joined GBLS’s Immigration Unit in 2013. Since then, she has helped people from all over the world who have witnessed or experienced unspeakable tragedies and faced severe persecutions. Her efforts have ensured that many who are fleeing extreme discrimination and danger are able to seek justice and safe harbor.

Members of the Society of Fellows experience a tour of the Museum of Fine Arts’ summer exhibit, Matisse in the Studio. Each Fellows pledge supports the work of the Boston Bar Foundation’s many public service initiatives. The growing number of Fellows, now over 400, learn about the work their gifts support, including programs supporting Boston’s youth and grants to legal services organizations, at events throughout the year.

Boston Public High School students stand with Natashia Tidwell (center left, Collora) and Mark Smith (center right, BBA President, Laredo & Smith) on the morning of the first day of work with the Summer Jobs Program. The program, a partnership with the City of Boston and the Boston Private Industry Council, employs students in internships at legal offices across the city. In 2017, 52 students gained valuable office experience and were given insight into the legal profession.

Attorneys network surrounding the chocolate fountain, a staple at this year’s Boston Bar Foundation Summer Fundraiser. Guests at the event are treated to delicious dishes from area restaurants while learning about the public service programs their contribution supports.

The Public Interest Leadership Program’s class of 2016-2017 hosted their symposium, Constitutional Battlegrounds: Civil Rights in a Changing Landscape, earlier this year. The event’s speakers addressed a number of issues recently in the national spotlight, both in the media and the courts. Nearly 100 attorneys and interested members of the community packed the BBA to hear insights from the panels of experts.

This fall, the 14th Public Interest Leadership Program (PILP) started their term. Twenty attorneys were selected for the program based on their experience and dedication to public service and civic engagement. The program now includes nearly 200 alumni who’ve gone on to serve the BBA in other capacities and carry their passion for serving the public interest into the community.

Piper Kerman, author of Orange is the New Black, addressed the audience at the BBA’s Annual Meeting. Kerman, a former prisoner, discussed her work bringing prison issues to the forefront of national conversation. She also acknowledged the BBA’s report No Time to Wait: Recommendations for a Fair and Effective Criminal Justice System, which was released this fall. The report commends the reforms proposed earlier this year by Massachusetts leaders based on research by the Council of State Governments (CSG), but strongly urges lawmakers to enact broader reforms designed to further reduce recidivism, and make the criminal justice system fairer and more cost-efficient.

Lawyer Referral Service (LRS) staff attend the Massachusetts Conference for Women to introduce the public to the services it offers. Thousands of requests come through each year and referrals are made out to experienced attorneys practicing nearly 350 areas of law. The LRS also houses a dedicated Military Legal Help Line, which connects veterans, military personnel, and their families with lawyers and other legal resources appropriate to their needs.

The three award recipients at November’s Beacon Award for Diversity & Inclusion stand with members of the Beacon Award Selection Committee. Brent Henry received the Voice of Change Award for his work recruiting and retaining diverse legal talent while at Partners Healthcare. The Empowerment Award went to Iván Espinoza-Madrigal for his work on civil rights issues, including racial justice, immigrant rights, and LGBT/HIV equality, as the Executive Director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Economic Justice. Susan Alexander accepted the Corporate Champion Award on behalf of Biogen. Biogen’s legal department has developed a system of diversity metrics which the legal team uses when choosing outside counsel.
Above, left to right: Brent Henry (Mintz Levin), Iván Espinoza-Madrigal (Lawyers’ Committee), Susan Alexander (Biogen), Sarah Kim (Treasurer and Receiver General of Massachusetts), Kate Cook (Sugarman Rogers), Stephen Hall (Holland & Knight), and Damon Hart (Liberty Mutual).

Hosted at Suffolk University Law School, the annual Pro Bono Recruitment Fair and Open House connects law students and attorneys to volunteer opportunities across the state. Over 25 organizations recruited at the fair this year.

BBA President Mark Smith (right) met with Principal Danladi Bobbitt of the John D. Philbrick Elementary School in Roslindale. As a participant in the Principal Partners event, hosted by Boston Public Schools, Boston Plan for Excellence, and Bank of America, the BBA President has the opportunity to visit a school and engage in meaningful conversations about the role of education in our society.

BBA LRS Attends MOVA Conference for Victim Rights

On Wednesday, BBA Lawyer Referral Service (BBA LRS) staff attended the 2017 Victim Rights Conference hosted by the Massachusetts Office of Victim Assistance (MOVA) in honor of April’s Victim Rights Awareness Month. This annual conference brings together survivors and victim service providers for a day of learning and networking through exhibitors and workshops. The BBA LRS emphasized its mission to connect individuals with legal assistance, highlighting its ability to connect callers with lawyers and resources in a wide range of areas.

Conference attendees were welcomed by Attorney General Maura Healey and the Executive Director of MOVA, Liam Lowney. The conference recognized and celebrated both advocates and survivors of crime throughout the Commonwealth, highlighting the importance of empowering the voices and stories of victims and to bring attention to some of the racial and social justice issues facing the city.

Community outreach events like these are opportunities for the BBA to raise awareness about the LRS and the resources it has to both members of the public and other non-profits. If you would like more information about the LRS, please contact Solana Goss, LRS Operations Manager, at [email protected] or 617-778-1978.

Public Service: A Year in Photos

Blizzards and slow public transportation didn’t stop our volunteers from getting out in the community and giving back during 2015. Take a look below for highlights from the BBA’s 2015 public service efforts:

Lawyers braved the snow and marched to the Massachusetts State House for the annual Walk to the Hill. The 2015 Walk to the Hill was more important than ever. As you may remember, the BBA Statewide Task Force to Expand Civil Legal Aid in Massachusetts released its long-awaited report in November called Investing in Justice, which found that the majority of clients seeking legal assistance are turned away and made the business case for an additional $30 million in civil legal aid funding. The Legislature appropriated $17 million to fund civil legal aid, a satisfying increase in a year marked largely by level funding.

Lawyers braved the snow and marched to the Massachusetts State House for the annual Walk to the Hill. The 2015 Walk to the Hill was more important than ever. As you may remember, the BBA Statewide Task Force to Expand Civil Legal Aid in Massachusetts released its long-awaited report in November called Investing in Justice, which found that the majority of clients seeking legal assistance are turned away and made the business case for an additional $30 million in civil legal aid funding. The Legislature appropriated $17 million to fund civil legal aid, a satisfying increase in a year marked largely by level funding.

In January 2014, the John & Abigail Adams Benefit raised over $650,000 to help to fund grants to 23 Massachusetts community organizations providing legal services in areas such as immigration, domestic violence and homelessness.

In January 2014, the John & Abigail Adams Benefit raised over $650,000 to help to fund grants to 23 Massachusetts community organizations providing legal services in areas such as immigration, domestic violence and homelessness.

With the help of PILP 11, the BBA Reentry Education Program expanded to provide civil legal workshops to participants in the CHOICE Program at Boston Municipal Court, Roxbury. Overall, volunteers led 12 sessions with a total of 103 participants to prepare participants to address civil legal issues they may face upon reentry.

With the help of PILP 11, the BBA Reentry Education Program expanded to provide civil legal workshops to participants in the CHOICE Program at Boston Municipal Court, Roxbury. Overall, volunteers led 12 sessions with a total of 103 participants to prepare participants to address civil legal issues they may face upon reentry.

In 2015, over 160 volunteers taught 570 high school students in 12 schools about personal finance and budgeting, credit cards, and buying a car through the M. Ellen Carpenter Financial Literacy Program. As you may remember, the BBA partners with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court to run the program throughout the state.

In 2015, over 160 volunteers taught 570 high school students in 12 schools about personal finance and budgeting, credit cards, and buying a car through the M. Ellen Carpenter Financial Literacy Program. As you may remember, the BBA partners with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court to run the program throughout the state.

The BBF’s popular Casino Night once again drew a large crowd. The event, which supports the BBA Summer Jobs Program by funding paid internships for Boston high school students in nonprofit and government agencies each summer through the program, raised more than $34,000.

The BBF’s popular Casino Night once again drew a large crowd. The event, which supports the BBA Summer Jobs Program by funding paid internships for Boston high school students in nonprofit and government agencies each summer through the program, raised more than $34,000.

The Lawyer for the Day in the Boston Housing Court Program didn’t slow down this year! With the help of 350 volunteers, the program assisted over 1,213 landlords and tenants in the Boston Housing Court.

The Lawyer for the Day in the Boston Housing Court Program didn’t slow down this year! With the help of 350 volunteers, the program assisted over 1,213 landlords and tenants in the Boston Housing Court.

This spring, 77 volunteer taught over 1,000 Boston public school students from kindergarten through seniors in high school about the importance of laws through the BBA’s Law Day in the Schools Program.

This spring, 77 volunteer taught over 1,000 Boston public school students from kindergarten through seniors in high school about the importance of laws through the BBA’s Law Day in the Schools Program.

The BBA presented three public service awards to deserving recipients at the annual Law Day Dinner. Barbara Mitchell, the former Executive Director of Community Legal Services and Counseling Center, received the John G. Brooks Legal Services Award to honor her leadership and commitment to legal services; Al Wallis, the Executive Director of Brown Rudnick Center for Public Interest, received the Thurgood Marshall Award for his leadership in public interest and corporate social responsibility; and Jack Ward, the former Associate Director for Finance & Development at Greater Boston Legal Services, received the President’s Award for this leadership and guidance at Greater Boston Legal Services.

The BBA presented three public service awards to deserving recipients at the annual Law Day Dinner. Barbara Mitchell, the former Executive Director of Community Legal Services and Counseling Center, received the John G. Brooks Legal Services Award to honor her leadership and commitment to legal services; Al Wallis, the Executive Director of Brown Rudnick Center for Public Interest, received the Thurgood Marshall Award for his leadership in public interest and corporate social responsibility; and Jack Ward, the former Associate Director for Finance & Development at Greater Boston Legal Services, received the President’s Award for this leadership and guidance at Greater Boston Legal Services.

The BBF held the second annual Passports to Pairings event, where 100 % of the proceeds supported the BBA Public Service Programs. The event raise nearly $34,000, featured food and beverage pairings, and gave attendees an opportunity learn more about the BBA and BBF’s work in the community.

The BBF held the second annual Passports to Pairings event, where 100 % of the proceeds supported the BBA Public Service Programs. The event raise nearly $34,000, featured food and beverage pairings, and gave attendees an opportunity learn more about the BBA and BBF’s work in the community.

The BBA continued to step up its commitment to the Mayor’s Summer Jobs Program by placing a record-breaking 65 Boston high school students in paid internships at Boston law firms, legal departments, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations through the BBA Summer Jobs Program. The BBF also increased its commitment to the program by funding 15 of these paid positions at non-profit community organizations, government offices and courts.

The BBA continued to step up its commitment to the Mayor’s Summer Jobs Program by placing a record-breaking 65 Boston high school students in paid internships at Boston law firms, legal departments, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations through the BBA Summer Jobs Program. The BBF also increased its commitment to the program by funding 15 of these paid positions at non-profit community organizations, government offices and courts.

While October is officially Pro Bono Month, the BBA celebrated pro bono all year-round. Since January 2015, the BBA has trained over 400 attorneys to take pro bono cases in a range of areas, including landlord tenant law, veterans discharge appeals, and debt collections.

While October is officially Pro Bono Month, the BBA celebrated pro bono all year-round. Since January 2015, the BBA has trained over 400 attorneys to take pro bono cases in a range of areas, including landlord tenant law, veterans discharge appeals, and debt collections.

The BBF held an inaugural Society of Fellows Appreciation Breakfast at the Liberty Hotel in Boston this November. The Breakfast was an opportunity to recognize members of the Society for their support of the BBF and to celebrate what their generosity has allowed the BBF to accomplish in the last year.

The BBF held an inaugural Society of Fellows Appreciation Breakfast at the Liberty Hotel in Boston this November. The Breakfast was an opportunity to recognize members of the Society for their support of the BBF and to celebrate what their generosity has allowed the BBF to accomplish in the last year.

The Claflin Center was packed on November 12th for the Veterans Day Reception, which featured a lively speech and Q & A with Congressman Seth Moulton, a former Marine Corps Captain who served four tours in Iraq. This event aimed to build a community for servicemembers in the legal field to share common experiences and challenges.

The Claflin Center was packed on November 12th for the Veterans Day Reception, which featured a lively speech and Q & A with Congressman Seth Moulton, a former Marine Corps Captain who served four tours in Iraq. This event aimed to build a community for servicemembers in the legal field to share common experiences and challenges.

BBA President Lisa Arrowood spent the morning observing a humanities teacher meeting, greeting students, and visiting classrooms at the Frederick Pilot Middle School in Dorchester through BPE’s Principal for a Day Program.

BBA President Lisa Arrowood spent the morning observing a humanities teacher meeting, greeting students, and visiting classrooms at the Frederick Pilot Middle School in Dorchester through BPE’s Principal for a Day Program.

The BBA Lawyer Referral Service participated in a number of community events this year, including the Massachusetts Conference for Women which drew a crowd of nearly 10,000. These events help to raise awareness of about the largest public service program of the Boston Bar Association, which fielded over 7,700 calls last year.

The BBA Lawyer Referral Service participated in a number of community events this year, including the Massachusetts Conference for Women which drew a crowd of nearly 10,000. These events help to raise awareness of about the largest public service program of the Boston Bar Association, which fielded over 7,700 calls last year.

BBA Lawyer Referral Service Connects with Boston Community

The BBA LRS spent last Wednesday and Thursday doing outreach at the Massachusetts Women's Conference.

The BBA LRS spent last Wednesday and Thursday doing outreach at the Massachusetts Women’s Conference.

Along with a crowd of nearly 10,000 individuals, staff from the BBA’s Lawyer Referral Service (LRS) exhibited at the 11th Annual Massachusetts Conference for Women last week at the Boston Convention Center.

The Massachusetts Conference for Women is the largest community outreach and marketing event of the year for the BBA’s Lawyer Referral Service.  For the LRS staff, this day is a rare opportunity to meet with members of the public face-to-face, rather than on the other end of a phone call, and a great opportunity to raise awareness about the LRS and the resources it has to both members of the public and other lawyers

“This conference is an event I look forward to each year,” said Solana Goss, LRS Intake Coordinator.  “The LRS program speaks to nearly 8,000 individuals per year, entirely on the phone or through our online request function.  It’s nice to meet people directly who end up calling a day or two later. Throughout the conference we also met BBA members, new lawyers, law students, and members of the legal community we hope will come through the doors at 16 Beacon!”

BBA LRS Celebrates Boston Pride

The theme of this year’s festivities was “Wicked Proud,” evidenced by the city draped in rainbow flags.

The theme of this year’s festivities was “Wicked Proud,” evidenced by the city draped in rainbow flags.

This past Saturday, the BBA Lawyer Referral Service (LRS) joined thousands of participants and spectators at the 45th Annual Boston Pride Parade to support the LGBTQ community.

The festival is part of “Pride Week,” 10 days of events, parades and live performances organized by the nonprofit, Boston Pride. More than 200 companies, schools and other institutions participated.

A number of public officials took part in the festivities, including Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, and Attorney General Maura Healey.

BBA staff set up their booth at City Hall Plaza to reach out to Boston’s diverse community, informing attendees how to obtain legal assistance through the LRS.  The LRS attends outreach events throughout Boston year round to spread the word about the services offered to public.

BBA employees set up shop at Government Center’s City Hall Plaza.

BBA employees set up shop at Government Center’s City Hall Plaza.

 

For more information on the BBA’s Lawyer Referral Service, please contact Solana Goss, LRS Intake Coordinator, at [email protected].