Posts Categorized: Judicial Internship

Looking for an Internship This Summer? Apply now for The BBA’s Diversity & Inclusion Section’s Internship Program

Are you – or do you know – a law student looking to spend their 1L or 2L summer gaining professional legal experience? The BBA’s Diversity & Inclusion Section’s Summer Judicial Internship Program is an unpaid, non-credit internship in which students work directly with a judge during their 1L or 2L summer. The program provides law students with the valuable mentoring and professional experience needed to succeed after graduation.  The program also has a long-term goal: to bolster efforts to retain a diverse and inclusive population of young lawyers here in Boston. Throughout the course of the summer, interns observe courtroom proceedings and enhance their legal research and writing skills. In addition to their work, they engage with BBA Members and one another at professional development seminars and career exploration programs held at the BBA.

The Diversity & Inclusion Section launched the Judicial Internship Program in 2010, and for six years has facilitated this unique opportunity for Boston area law students to gain access to internships in the Boston Municipal Courts, Massachusetts State District Courts, the Massachusetts Superior Court, the Probate and Family Court, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Massachusetts, and the United States Bankruptcy Appellate Panel for the First Circuit. More than 100 law students have participated in this program since 2010.

To apply, students must have completed the 1L or 2L year (or the equivalent) and must be able to work a minimum of 15 hours per week for a total of 8 weeks for most placements. There are specific guidelines and requirements for each placement. Students are encouraged to carefully read the application requirements and specifications for each position sought before submitting your application.

Details about the following internship placements for these internships are available on our program website along with instructions for how to apply. We also suggest visiting our internship FAQ page for more details and tips for your application.

Thank you to these courts for their ongoing participation: The Boston Municipal Courts, the Massachusetts State District Courts, the Massachusetts Superior Court, the Probate and Family Court, the Massachusetts Land Court, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Massachusetts, and the United States Bankruptcy Appellate Panel for the First Circuit.

Law students may contact the program administrator, Cassandra Shavney, [email protected] with questions or concerns.

Our 2016 Summer Interns worked over 3, 500 hours while sharpening their professional legal expertise.

Summer Internship Applications Being Accepted Through March 7, 2016

The deadline for the BBA Summer Internship Program has been extended to March 7, 2016.

The deadline for the BBA Summer Internship Program has been extended to March 7, 2016.

The Boston Bar Association’s Diversity & Inclusion Section’s Summer Internship application deadline has been extended to Monday, March 7, 2016. Placements are available in the following courts: Boston Municipal Courts, Land Court, Massachusetts District Courts, the Massachusetts Superior Court, the Probate and Family Court, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Massachusetts, and the United States Bankruptcy Appellate Panel for the First Circuit.  Placements are also available with the Massachusetts Department of Labor Standards, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and the Roxbury and Quincy offices of the Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS). The application period for the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office placements has ended.

The BBA’s internship experiences are complemented by a series of career exploration programs at the BBA, observation in a number area courts, as well as opportunities to connect with leaders in the BBA community and our affinity bar partner organizations. Law students of all backgrounds are invited to participate in this valuable opportunity to grow in understanding of one another and to ask deeper questions about what they can expect as they move forward in the profession.

There are specific guidelines and requirements for each placement. Students are encouraged to carefully read the application requirements and specifications for each position sought before submitting your application. Application instructions are available on our program website along with instructions for how to apply.

 

Looking for an Internship This Summer? Apply now for The BBA’s Diversity & Inclusion Section’s Internship Program

The Judicial Internship Program offers law students valuable work experience. The 2015 Judicial Interns worked at nine courts in Greater Boston for a total of over 4,100 hours throughout the summer.

The Judicial Internship Program offers law students valuable work experience. The 2015 Judicial Interns worked at nine courts in Greater Boston for a total of over 4,100 hours throughout the summer.

Are you – or do you know – a law student looking to spend their 1L or 2L summer gaining professional legal experience? The BBA’s Diversity & Inclusion Section’s Internship Program is an unpaid, non-credit internship in which students work directly with a judge or public agency legal team during their 1L or 2L summer. The program provides law students with the valuable mentoring and professional experience needed to succeed after graduation.  The program also has a long-term goal: to bolster efforts to retain a diverse and inclusive population of young lawyers here in Boston. Throughout the course of the summer, interns observe courtroom proceedings and enhance their legal research and writing skills. In addition to their work, they engage with BBA Members and one another at professional development seminars and career exploration programs held at the BBA.

The Diversity & Inclusion Section launched the Judicial Internship Program in 2010, and for six years has facilitated this unique opportunity for Boston area law students to gain access to internships in the Boston Municipal Courts, Massachusetts State District Courts, the Massachusetts Superior Court, the Probate and Family Court, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Massachusetts, and the United States Bankruptcy Appellate Panel for the First Circuit. More than 100 law students have participated in this program since 2010.

This year we are expanding the program to include placements in state government. Interns may apply for the BBA’s Diversity & Inclusion Section’s Internship Program, with placements in the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office, the Massachusetts Department of Labor Standards, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and the Roxbury and Quincy offices of the Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS).

To apply, students must have completed the 1L or 2L year (or the equivalent) and must be able to work a minimum of 15 hours per week for a total of 8 weeks for most placements. There are specific guidelines and requirements for each placement. Students are encouraged to carefully read the application requirements and specifications for each position sought before submitting your application.

An information session will be held on Friday, January 22, 2016 from 5:00pm – 7:00pm at the Boston Bar Association. Click here to register.

Details about the following internship placements for these internships are available on our program website along with instructions for how to apply.

Thank you to these courts for their ongoing participation: The Boston Municipal Courts, the Massachusetts State District Courts, the Massachusetts Superior Court, the Probate and Family Court, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Massachusetts, and the United States Bankruptcy Appellate Panel for the First Circuit.  And a warm welcome to our new internship providers: The Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS) – Quincy, the Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS) – Roxbury, Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH), Massachusetts Department of Labor Standards (DLS), and the Office of Massachusetts Attorney General.

Law students may contact our program administrator, Joe McKenzie [email protected] with questions or concerns.

We invite government agencies, legal services offices, and courts seeking talented law student interns to connect with us to get involved engaging students through this initiative. Please contact our Diversity & Inclusion Section’s Pipeline and Recruitment Committee Co-Chairs,  Sarah  Kim, General Counsel to the Treasurer and Receiver General of Massachusetts and Redi Kasollja of Foley & Lardner LLP.

Judicial Interns Wrap Up Another Successful Summer

The 2015 Judicial Interns worked at nine courts in Greater Boston for a total of over 4,100 hours throughout the summer.

The 2015 Judicial Interns worked at nine courts in Greater Boston for a total of over 4,100 hours throughout the summer.

Beyond the Billable would like to congratulate the 2015 Judicial Interns on all of their hard work volunteering in the courts. The program gives law students the opportunity to gain firsthand experience while working closely with a judge at one of nine participating courts in and around the Greater Boston area.

This summer marks the fifth year since the internship was created by the BBA’s Diversity & Inclusion Section, with the goal of retaining a diverse population of young lawyers here in Boston. Additionally, the program aims to provide law students with the valuable mentoring and professional experience needed to succeed after graduation. This year we had a total of 24 students from our five sponsor schools, George Mason University School of Law, and Western New England School of Law collectively volunteer over 4,000 hours!

We caught up with Alexander Conley (New England Law | Boston Class of 2017) to hear more about his experience working with Judge Catherine K. Byrne in Boston Municipal Court; here’s what he had to say:

“One of the most memorable moments during my internship happened after being on the job for only a little while.  After observing a motion to suppress, the judge that I was working with asked me if I ’wanted to take this one.’  At first I had no idea what she meant. However, when she explained that she wanted me to draft the opinion for her I was very surprised. It was the first time during the internship that I was asked to do something of such substance, and when I got the assignment I was both excited and nervous.”

When we asked Christopher Boutin (Suffolk University Law, Class of 2017) what his most memorable moment during the internship was, here’s what he told us:

“The most memorable experience of the summer was getting the opportunity to watch the Tsarnayev sentencing hearing in the Federal Courthouse. Judge Tochka urged us to attend so we could experience how a high profile case differs from other cases.

I would highly recommend the judicial internship to ALL law students. Overall, this experience provided me with the kind of knowledge that you cannot learn in the classroom. It provides with the knowledge that only comes from years of experience.”

Congratulations to all of the 2015 summer interns, and we wish you all the best of luck during this upcoming school year!

Judicial Interns Tour Bankruptcy Court

The Judicial Interns and BBA interns headed to the Bankruptcy Court for a tour earlier this week.

The Judicial Interns and BBA interns headed to the Bankruptcy Court for a tour earlier this week.

Guest Post: Elijah Oyenuga is one of the Summer Jobs Student working at the Boston Bar Association. He recently graduated from Another Course to College in Brighton and will be attending Lesley University next year.

On the 14th of July the BBA granted me, as well as this year’s Judicial Interns, the much-appreciated opportunity to take a tour of the United States Bankruptcy Courthouse. As we approached the building, I was in complete awe: the outside of this Federal building was immaculate. However, the exterior was nothing compared to its interior design. Complete with shiny tiled flooring and golden elevator doors, it was a sight to behold, especially for an architectural geek like me.

During the tour, we were able to learn about the inner workings of this specific courthouse. I was surprised to learn that the courtrooms were completely paperless, which truly distinguished it from other courthouses I’ve visited. The technology built into the courtrooms allowed attorneys and the Judge to display their documents on their spread-out screens; they were even able to mark up their documents in real life on Apple iPads. The most distinguishable element of this courtroom was that rather than typing everything being said, the stenographer simply monitored the courtroom’s recording technology—editing it in real time in order to be used either in the same or future hearings. It was described as “the next step in stenography evolution” by the Judge.

Before we listened in on the two hearings, we were granted permission to explore the Judge’s chambers. What I thought would be a small room with one round table ended up looking more like a modest apartment. Inside the chambers, we were able to meet Judge Frank J. Bailey, who generously took time out of his day to give us a few laughs and to educate us on what bankruptcy law is really about: a fresh start for the honest debtor.

We also attended a pre-trial hearing and a motion hearing. The motion hearing was presented by the lawyer for a husband and wife who had completed a Bankruptcy plan and are attempting to sell their house. In order to do so, the couple was asking the court to issue an order that the second mortgage was discharged.  The other matter was a pre-trial hearing about a man who allegedly squandered the money in his family’s estate, which was once worth millions of dollars but is now virtually worthless. He is now being sued by his family. Although the legal jargon was confusing and extensive at times, it was still very interesting to see how the proceedings were carried out. I look forward to more opportunities like this throughout my summer at the Boston Bar Association.

 

A Student Perspective: Visiting Moakley Courthouse

The BBAs Judicial interns and

BBA interns in front of the John Joseph Moakley Courthouse. 

Guest Post: Jennifer Le is one of the Summer Jobs Student working at the Boston Bar Association. Jennifer recently graduated from Boston Community Leadership Academy in Hyde Park and will be participating in the Foundation Year Program at Northeastern University next year.

Last Tuesday, I had the opportunity to visit John Joseph Moakley Courthouse with the BBA Judicial Interns. The Moakley Courthouse is a beautiful building filled with amazing, interesting architectural design and one of Boston’s historical tourist spot. This courthouse is also known for its famous federal cases, including the Boston Marathon Bomber (United States v. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev) and the Whitey Bulger cases (United States of America v. James J. Bulger).

Our tour guide educated us on the architecture of the building. The front of the building is made up of metal that’s nearly indestructible to prevent bombings and injuries of any kind. The courthouse is also designed to emphasize equality amongst criminals, citizens, lawyers, and Judges. For example, the Judge’s seat is at eye level of a lawyer when the lawyer stands up and criminals are not to wear orange jumpsuits at sentencing.

We had the chance to observe three court cases, including a child pornography case, kidnapping case, and an alleged fraudulent workers compensation case. At the end of the kidnapping case, we even spoke with Judge Nathaniel M. Gorton about the court proceeding in greater detail.

It’s astonishing to see how much history is embedded into one building and to realize that it will continue to amaze and motivate people like myself. I can’t wait to see the long and exciting future that the Moakley Courthouse holds, with all the amazing cases, the art and design. The knowledge and experience will be endless! I’ve always wanted to become a lawyer, and I feel even more motivated after visiting the Moakley Courthouse.

Celebrating 5 Years of Opportunity: The Diversity & Inclusion Section’s Judicial Internship Program

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On Monday, June 1, 2015, the BBA’s Diversity & Inclusion Section hosted a celebration to mark its Judicial Internship Program’s fifth year.  Participating judges, interns past and present, and members of the BBA gathered to recognize this important milestone in the BBA’s efforts to retain a diverse and inclusive population of young lawyers in Boston.

Since 2010, the BBA’s Diversity & Inclusion Section has facilitated this Judicial Internship Program to provide law students with the valuable professional experience of access to internships in the Commonwealth’s Trial Courts, including the Boston Municipal Court, District Court, Superior Court, and the Probate and Family Court.  Students are also placed in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Massachusetts and the United States Bankruptcy Appellate Panel for the First Circuit (“BAP”). More than 125 law students have participated since the program’s inception.

Offering remarks about the program’s launch at the BBA, the 2010 Diversity Inclusion Section’s Co-Chair, E. Macey Russell of Choate Hall & Stewart, reflected on the win-win impact of a judicial internship.  Students obtain immeasurable benefits from the education and career development opportunities related to working with a Judge, and the understaffed trial courts are appointed some extra pairs of hands.  Hon. Robert N. Tochka spoke about the importance of offering opportunities to students of all backgrounds.  It was his personal effort to bring on rising 2L law student interns when he was a judge in the Boston Municipal Court that inspired the BBA to formalize the internship program.  But for Judge Tochka’s support and persuasive skills in recruiting judges to take on BBA interns, this program would not have reached this milestone.

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Massachusetts District Court Judge Paul M. Yee, Jr. , E. Macey Russell of Choate Hall & Stewart LLP, and Superior Court Judge Robert N. Tochka

This year’s class of 24 Summer Judicial Interns  includes students from Boston College Law School, Boston University School of Law, George Mason University School of Law, New England Law | Boston, Suffolk University Law School, and Western New England University School of Law.  The interns are fully immersed in what is shaping up to be a very busy summer.

In addition to their work in the courts, interns will attend weekly enrichment activities held at the BBA where they will be introduced to practitioners from various corners of the profession.  The interns will also attend the various programs and events sponsored by the Diversity & Inclusion Section this summer that seek to increase engagement and understanding among law students and attorneys of all backgrounds.

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Judge Robert N. Tochka of the Superior Court, flanked by Paulette Pagan, his 2014 Judicial Intern, and Chris Boutin, who will be interning with Tochka this summer.

 

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Suffolk Law Professional and Career Development Counselor Quaime Lee with Suffolk Law Students

 

Identifying the Impact – The Summer 2014 Program by the Numbers

The BBA's  Judicial Internship Program allows Boston area law students to gain access to internships in the Boston Municipal Courts, Massachusetts State District Courts, the Probate and Family Court, and the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Massachusetts.

The BBA’s Judicial Internship Program allows Boston area law students to gain access to internships in the Boston Municipal Courts, Massachusetts State District Courts, the Probate and Family Court, and the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Massachusetts.

If you read Beyond the Billable at the beginning of the summer, you had a chance to learn about the BBA Summer Judicial Interns (see here and here). This program offers law students an opportunity to work closely with judges and enhance their legal research and writing skills. That’s why we wanted to bring an article in last week’s BBA Week to your attention, which did a great job of displaying the scope and impact of the program with some pretty cool statistics. If you didn’t get a chance to read it, click here, and be sure to keep an eye out for the most recent case summaries from the 2014 Summer Judicial Interns here.

Making Sense of the New NY Bar Pro Bono Requirement

The BBA Judicial Internship provides law students with an opportunity to work directly with a judge and hone legal skills, while working towards the 50 hours pro bono requirement for the New York Bar.

The BBA Judicial Internship provides law students with an opportunity to work directly with a judge and hone legal skills, while working towards the 50 hours pro bono requirement for the New York Bar.

If you’re a law student or recent law school graduate who is looking to practice in New York, you’ve probably  heard of the new pro bono requirement for bar applicants. If you haven’t, here’s the deal: the new requirement mandates that attorneys admitted to the New York Bar after January 1, 2015 must complete 50 hours of law-related pro bono work before filing their application (this includes those of you who took the July 2014 bar exam). Worried? Don’t be, the BBA is here to help. We’ve got two programs that could help you get closer to the 50 hour requirement.

Lawyer for the Day in the Boston Housing Court: If you’re 3:03 certified, you can volunteer to provide legal assistance to landlords and tenants on Thursday mornings at the Boston Housing Court. If you’re looking to get involved soon, you’re in luck! We have a training scheduled for Tuesday, October 28th at the BBA. Click here for more information.

Judicial Internship Program: Law students looking to work directly with a judge, observe courtroom proceedings and enhance their legal research and writing skills should check out the BBA’s Judicial Internship Program. The program runs year-round and the next round of applications for Spring 2015 are due on December 13th. Click here for more information about this opportunity.

Are you looking for additional opportunities? Stop by the Suffolk Pro Bono Fair on October 20th to learn about pro bono opportunities in Massachusetts for law students and new lawyers. Click here for more information.

If you have questions about what is eligible, be sure to contact the New York State Court of Appeals at [email protected].

If you have any questions about BBA programs, you can contact Katie D’Angelo @ [email protected].

BBA Judicial Interns Reflect on First Weeks on the Job

The 2014 Summer Judicial Interns at the BBA  for their orientation to the program.

The 2014 Summer Judicial Interns at the BBA for their orientation to the program.

Beyond the Billable recently gave you the details on BBA’s Summer Career Series geared towards new lawyers, law students, and our Judicial Interns – but if you’re wondering how our Summer interns are faring in the courts, we’ve got you covered.  We reached out to Boston College Law School student Kyle Litfin to hear more about his experience in his first two weeks working in the Boston Municipal Court’s Dorchester session with Judge James W. Coffey.  Here’s what he had to say:

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Kyle Litfin, Boston College Law

“It has only been two weeks and I feel like I have learned more about being a lawyer in my short time at the Dorchester Court than I have my entire first year in law school. Not only has the job provided interesting research and writing opportunities, but I have had the chance to witness pre-trial conferences, status conferences, and trials from start to finish. Watching an entire case, from jury selection to a verdict is truly remarkable. More importantly, watching lawyers give opening and closing statements, seeing different techniques for witness questioning, and observing when and how lawyers decide to object to statements and exhibits is both exciting and instructional.

Having the chance to work with Judge Coffey, the clerks, and my fellow interns allows for the experience to be extremely interactive. Not only does Judge Coffey always take the time to answer any and all of my questions, but the clerks, the court officers and all of the Dorchester Court staff are there to provide information and guidance whenever possible. Each day is something exciting and new, and I always look forward to going to work.”

Stay tuned throughout the summer as we check in with our Judicial Interns.