LAR Series Continued with Hands-On Workshop

Julie Tolek (Think Pink Law) and Danielle Spang (Law Office of Danielle Spang) led a workshop on how to draft a fee agreement when using LAR.

Julie Tolek (Think Pink Law) and Danielle Spang (Law Office of Danielle Spang) led a workshop on how to draft a fee agreement when using LAR.

BBA President Lisa Arrowood has focused her presidency on equipping new lawyers with practical skills, including helping lawyers better utilize Limited Assistance Representation (LAR) within their practice. The BBA’s LAR Practical Skills series has aimed to do just that. In the fourth segment offered in the series attendees had a chance to put their new knowledge to work as attorneys Julie Tolek (Think Pink Law) and Danielle Spang (Law Office of Danielle Spang) led a workshop on how to draft a fee agreement.

Here’s what speaker Attorney Tolek had to say about the program:

Why was a workshop on Drafting a Fee Agreement so important for attorneys practicing LAR?

“Talking about how to do something is easy but putting it in practice is where questions often arise. The LAR fee agreement is perhaps the most important component of beginning an attorney-client journey, and to be able to have hands-on time to screen for LAR appropriate situations and craft an agreement and discuss questions at the same time is the best way to learn to do it!”

What is the biggest takeaway that attorneys should remember from the program?

“Communication with your client and making sure they understand their responsibilities and what it means to be working with an attorney on an LAR basis is crucial. In my opinion, it matters less how you do it technically (whether bullet points or check boxes in your agreement) than that you actually DO it in a way that works for you and that the client understands. You could have as many check boxes as you want but if the client does not fully grasp what all of it means, those check boxes don’t mean much.”

Don’t miss the rest of the LAR Practical Skills series. Sign up for one of the upcoming sessions on how to use LAR in particular courts:

LAR Practical Skills: Housing Court
February 29th 12-1:30 pm

LAR Practical Skills: Probate & Family Court
March 22nd 12-1:30 pm

LAR Practical Skills: Boston Municipal Court & District Court
April 28th 12-1:30 pm

LAR Practical Skills: Land Court
May 24th 12-1:30 pm

Three Reasons to Apply to the Public Interest Leadership Program

The PILP program brings together a group of new lawyers committed to serving the community for a yearlong leadership development program.

The PILP program brings together a group of new lawyers committed to serving the community for a yearlong leadership development program.

Last Thursday, the BBA hosted an info session about its Public Interest Leadership Program (PILP) at 16 Beacon Street, where attendees heard from four successful PILP alumni about the program. The panelists offered insight into the application process, their personal PILP experience, and how they’ve remained involved at the BBA after completing the program.

Panelists included:

Jen Doran – Partner, Hinckley Allen, PILP ‘06-‘07

Jane Harper – Vice President and Council, State Street, PILP ’10-‘11

Katherine Schulte – Staff Attorney, Casa Myrna Vasquez, PILP 13-14

Daniel Dwyer – Shareholder, Murphy & King, PILP ‘03-‘04

The panelists discussed several reasons to apply to the PILP program and we have compiled the top three reasons below:

  1. PILP is one of the most valuable tools for networking and meeting people in the profession. PILP provides the opportunity to meet and connect with prominent leaders in the legal profession that you otherwise would not encounter. As Katherine Schulte pointed out, it is not only valuable to meet leaders in the legal profession, but at young lawyers it is important to meet people outside of your field of practice as well.
  2. Members of PILP class are exposed to and integrated into BBA leadership. The program sets the stage for other types of valuable leadership roles, both at the BBA and elsewhere. As a member of PILP you’ll join a powerful alumni network of lawyer leaders who by their actions demonstrate that part of being a successful lawyer is giving back to the community.
  3. PILP combines leadership and professional development with service to the community. Throughout the program the PILP class designs and implements their own public service project that addresses an issue within the legal community. Past projects have included educational program for Boston Public School students, board service training programs, and contributions to law review articles and publications.

The BBA is accepting applications to the ’16-’17 Public Interest Leadership Program through Friday, February 26th. More information on PILP and the application process is available here. Please email Neha Deshpande, Membership Outreach Assistant, at [email protected] with any questions.

Volunteer at the Regional Mock Trial Tournament at Boston College

VolunteerAre you looking for a volunteer opportunity? Serve as a judge for the Undergraduate Mock Trial Regional Tournament at Boston College on February 13th and 14th. Twenty-four teams from top schools in the area will be competing for a chance at the National Championship Tournament.

If you are unfamiliar with mock trial, it is a competition where college students prepare a legal case and compete against each other as both defense and plaintiff. The role of a judge is simply to score the teams, rule on objections and provide feedback for the teams.

You are welcome to sign up for as many rounds as you’d like. Take a look below for the time slots.

  • Round 1: Saturday, February 13: 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
  • Round 2: Saturday, February 13: 1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
  • Round 3: Sunday, February 14: 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
  • Round 4: Sunday, February 14: 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

There will be a training and instruction session immediately preceding each round, and breakfast, lunch and coffee will all be provided.
If you are interested in judging, please take a few seconds and go to this link to register for as many rounds as you would like.

Four Takeaways from PILP’s Discusses Charitable Board Services

Lisa Goodheart, President of the Boston Bar Foundation; Allison Bauer, Senior Director of Health and Wellness for the Boston Foundation; and Stacy Malone, Executive Director of the Victim’s Rights Law Center, spoke with PILP about getting involved with charitable board service.

Lisa Goodheart, President of the Boston Bar Foundation; Allison Bauer, Senior Director of Health and Wellness for the Boston Foundation; and Stacy Malone, Executive Director of the Victim’s Rights Law Center, spoke with PILP about getting involved with charitable board service.

Lawyers have the ability to provide their services in several different ways, and last Wednesday the PILP class learned about the value of charitable board service. The discussion was led by Lisa Goodheart, President of the Boston Bar Foundation; Allison Bauer, Senior Director of Health and Wellness for the Boston Foundation; and Stacy Malone, Executive Director of the Victim’s Rights Law Center.

The speakers began with a discussion of how they got involved with charitable board service, and then transitioned to providing practical advice and considerations to make when choosing non-profit boards to serve on. Below are the four most important points that came out of the discussion:

  1. Volunteer or work with the organization before making the commitment to serving on their board. This will provide the opportunity to familiarize yourself with the work the organization does and see if you truly connect with both the organization’s mission as well as their staff.
  2. Do your research, and make sure you understand the organization’s expectations of its board members. Every organization is different so it is important to be aware of term lengths, fundraising requirements, time commitments, etc. before signing on to be a board member. Don’t be shy about reaching out to existing board members to find the information you are looking for!
  3. Serving on a non-profit board is a donation of your time and efforts. It is important that you are not taking on more responsibilities than you are capable of, and that you are enjoying the work you are doing! Find an organization that you are both passionate to be a part of, but also utilizes your skills. Many organizations have fundraising requirements for their board members – if you are uncomfortable reaching out to people for donations, serving on that organization’s board might not be the best fit for you. Just because you don’t serve on the board does not mean you can’t help the organization in other ways!
  4. Don’t be afraid to shop around! Again, serving on a non-profit board is a donation of your time and efforts. Be sure that you are enjoying the work you are doing, and the people you are working with!

The BBA would like to thank by Lisa Goodheart, Allison Bauer, and Stacy Malone for speaking to the PILP class. If you’re interested in learning more about charitable board service, save the date of April 28th for our CLE regarding charitable board service! More details are forthcoming!

Interested in applying for the 16-17 PILP class? Click here to learn about the program and the application process!

Annual Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Pro Bono Training Draws Crowd

Hsindy Chen (Volunteer Lawyers Project), Jesse Redlener (Dalton & Finegold, LLP), Warren Agin (Swiggart & Agin, LLC), Kate Nicholson (Nicholson Shepard LLC), and Keri Wintle (Duane Morris LLP) led a training on taking Chapter 7 bankruptcy cases pro bono.

Hsindy Chen (Volunteer Lawyers Project), Jesse Redlener (Dalton & Finegold, LLP), Warren Agin (Swiggart & Agin, LLC), Kate Nicholson (Nicholson Shepard LLC), and Keri Wintle (Duane Morris LLP) to prepare attorneys to take pro bono Chapter 7 bankruptcy cases.

Last week, the BBA’s Bankruptcy Public Service Committee teamed up with the Volunteer Lawyers Project (VLP) for the annual Representing a Pro Bono Debtor in Chapter 7 Bankruptcy training. The training aims to recruit attorneys to participate in the Fresh Start Bankruptcy Legal Clinic at VLP and to take pro bono bankruptcy cases.

Beyond the Billable caught up with BBA Bankruptcy Public Service Committee Co-Chair Keri Wintle (Duane Morris LLP) to learn more. Here’s what she had to say about the training:

 What do you hope attorneys learned from the training?

 “I hope that the training demystified the process of filing a consumer chapter 7 bankruptcy case a bit and that we were able to convey just how important the volunteer attorneys are to the program.”

 Why should attorneys volunteer for VLP’s Pro Bono Bankruptcy Clinic?

“The Clinic provides an important and necessary service to those who need it the most, while also providing a practical and gratifying experience to the volunteer.”

Are you interested in getting involved in pro bono work? Check out these two upcoming pro bono trainings: Pro Bono Training: CORI Matters— Learn How to Help Low Income Clients Seal Criminal Records and Pro Bono Training: Family Law Court Clinic

Sign Up for Job Shadow Day

 

 

Job Shadow_postcard_2016

Don’t miss the Boston Private Industry Council (PIC)’s annual Job Shadow Day. As you may know, the PIC is one of our partners for the BBA Summer Jobs Program. With nearly 1,000 Boston public high school students participating each year, Job Shadow Day is a great place for employers to meet high school students who are eager to explore legal careers. This event, which serves as a precursor to Mayor Walsh’s citywide Summer Jobs Program, allows students to shadow professionals for a morning to give them a firsthand look into the skills and education needed to pursue a career in the legal field.

In the past, many of our Summer Jobs employers have identified eager students through this program to work in their offices through the BBA Summer Jobs Program.

Interested in getting involved? This half day program will take place on Friday, March 11th. Click here to learn more.

BBA Summer Jobs Recruitment Off to a Strong Start

 

Summer Jobs Jan21B

After a successful 2015 summer with 65 all-star Boston public high school students, we are prepping for another great summer. Thanks to the ongoing support of many of our employers who have participated for a number of years, we are already off to a strong start. So far, we’ve secured 39 positions for Boston public high school students in legal offices throughout Boston, including 10 positions funded by the Boston Bar Foundation at legal service and government agencies.

This year, we are also are extremely excited to offer increased recognition for our participating employers. In an effort to publicize your organization’s generous support of the BBA Summer Jobs Program, all employers will be recognized as a leading sponsor of the BBF’s annual Casino Night Fundraiser for Summer Jobs on March 31, 2016.

Is your office interested in providing a Boston public high school student with a meaningful professional experience, please contact Katie D’Angelo at [email protected] for additional information.

Eight Takeaways from Environmental Law Public Service Brown Bag

Last week's Environmental Law brown bag focused on how and why to get involved in your local conservation commission.

Last week’s Environmental Law brown bag focused on how and why to get involved in your local conservation commission.

Last week, the Environmental Law Public Service Committee hosted an interactive brown bag program called “Getting to Know Conservation Commissions: Their Role as a Local Environmental Agency and How to Get Involved in Your Local Commission.”

So what can attorneys do to support their local conservation commission? They can help draft orders and other regulatory documents for the commission, help the commission understand regulations, and keep the commission consistent with the Open Meetings Law and Public Records Law.

Here are eight reasons why Eugene Benson, the Executive Director of the Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions, thinks you should get involved in your local commission:

  1. Help your city or town protect wetlands and open space
  2. Add your expertise and knowledge to a local regulatory body implementing state law
  3. Gain experience in administering an environmental statute and regulations
  4. Gain visibility in your community
  5. Meet and work with the wonderful people on your local commission
  6. Meet others in town/city government
  7. It can be fun and challenging
  8. Make a positive difference

Society of Fellows Rings in the New Year

Boston Bar Foundation Fellows Joan Lukey, Hon. Nonnie S. Burnes (Ret.), and past Boston Bar Association President Paul Dacier.

Boston Bar Foundation Executive Fellows Joan Lukey, Hon. Nonnie S. Burnes (Ret.), and past Boston Bar Association President Paul Dacier.

Last Thursday, the Boston Bar Foundation’s Society of Fellows held its annual winter reception at 16 Beacon Street to celebrate the achievements and growth of the Society in 2015 and look towards the year ahead.

In 2015, the Society hit a major milestone: it grew to more than 400 members! These 400 attorneys are leaders of Boston’s legal profession and the BBF’s most dedicated supporters. They come together as a community several times throughout the year to mingle with friends and colleagues while learning more about what they’ve been supporting from inspirational speakers. Click here to see photos from last Thursday’s reception.

As the community of Fellows has grown, they have been able to make tremendous progress towards the BBF’s goal of a $5 million endowment, creating a stable and lasting foundation for the BBF’s work and freeing up other monies – such as 100 percent of the proceeds of the annual Adams Benefit – for the legal aid grants that increase access to justice for Greater Boston’s underserved. Last year alone, the BBF’s funding helped more than 37,000 underserved children, adults and families with essential legal aid in Greater Boston.

This year, the BBF is granting $950,000 to 23 local legal services organizations, including Prisoners’ Legal Services of Massachusetts (PLSMA), which promotes the safe, humane and lawful treatment of Massachusetts prisoners.

At the reception, Leslie Walker, Executive Director of PLSMA, was able to communicate why PLSMA’s work – which the BBF helps to support – is so fundamentally important to our community.  Leslie has spent the past 30 years increasing access to justice for Greater Boston’s underserved, the last 15 of which at PLSMA.

She informed the crowd that PLSMA focuses the funds it receives from the BBF on its current top priorities: access to healthcare and prevention of excessive force. She was able to share some heartrending stories about PLSMA’s clients, and impart the poignant message that while much of society writes off individuals who have committed crimes, lawyers have a unique understanding of how crucial it is to protect their rights. That’s why the BBF has supported PLSMA for more than 15 years!

Learn more about joining the Society of Fellows here, or contact Tara Trask at [email protected] or (617) 778-1984.

Looking for an Internship This Summer? Apply now for The BBA’s Diversity & Inclusion Section’s Internship Program

The Judicial Internship Program offers law students valuable work experience. The 2015 Judicial Interns worked at nine courts in Greater Boston for a total of over 4,100 hours throughout the summer.

The Judicial Internship Program offers law students valuable work experience. The 2015 Judicial Interns worked at nine courts in Greater Boston for a total of over 4,100 hours throughout the summer.

Are you – or do you know – a law student looking to spend their 1L or 2L summer gaining professional legal experience? The BBA’s Diversity & Inclusion Section’s Internship Program is an unpaid, non-credit internship in which students work directly with a judge or public agency legal team during their 1L or 2L summer. The program provides law students with the valuable mentoring and professional experience needed to succeed after graduation.  The program also has a long-term goal: to bolster efforts to retain a diverse and inclusive population of young lawyers here in Boston. Throughout the course of the summer, interns observe courtroom proceedings and enhance their legal research and writing skills. In addition to their work, they engage with BBA Members and one another at professional development seminars and career exploration programs held at the BBA.

The Diversity & Inclusion Section launched the Judicial Internship Program in 2010, and for six years has facilitated this unique opportunity for Boston area law students to gain access to internships in the Boston Municipal Courts, Massachusetts State District Courts, the Massachusetts Superior Court, the Probate and Family Court, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Massachusetts, and the United States Bankruptcy Appellate Panel for the First Circuit. More than 100 law students have participated in this program since 2010.

This year we are expanding the program to include placements in state government. Interns may apply for the BBA’s Diversity & Inclusion Section’s Internship Program, with placements in the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office, the Massachusetts Department of Labor Standards, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and the Roxbury and Quincy offices of the Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS).

To apply, students must have completed the 1L or 2L year (or the equivalent) and must be able to work a minimum of 15 hours per week for a total of 8 weeks for most placements. There are specific guidelines and requirements for each placement. Students are encouraged to carefully read the application requirements and specifications for each position sought before submitting your application.

An information session will be held on Friday, January 22, 2016 from 5:00pm – 7:00pm at the Boston Bar Association. Click here to register.

Details about the following internship placements for these internships are available on our program website along with instructions for how to apply.

Thank you to these courts for their ongoing participation: The Boston Municipal Courts, the Massachusetts State District Courts, the Massachusetts Superior Court, the Probate and Family Court, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Massachusetts, and the United States Bankruptcy Appellate Panel for the First Circuit.  And a warm welcome to our new internship providers: The Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS) – Quincy, the Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS) – Roxbury, Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH), Massachusetts Department of Labor Standards (DLS), and the Office of Massachusetts Attorney General.

Law students may contact our program administrator, Joe McKenzie [email protected] with questions or concerns.

We invite government agencies, legal services offices, and courts seeking talented law student interns to connect with us to get involved engaging students through this initiative. Please contact our Diversity & Inclusion Section’s Pipeline and Recruitment Committee Co-Chairs,  Sarah  Kim, General Counsel to the Treasurer and Receiver General of Massachusetts and Redi Kasollja of Foley & Lardner LLP.